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Paedophile DJ Jimmy Savile - What I 'Knew' But Never Reported Years Ago

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The BBC is getting blamed for doing nothing about Jimmy Savile, although it seems, over the years, five police forces actually investigated stories about him in some way and did nothing.

I worked in British television from 1973 onwards, though only twice on BBC programmes; the rest of the time, I worked for ITV and independent companies. Still, I heard rumours about Jimmy Savile.

The rumours were mostly that he was gay.

Now it seems he was not gay.

Oddly, I heard about his dodgy interest in young girls from people outside television and before I ever worked on TV programmes.

In 1970, a girlfriend mentioned to me that, when she had been growing up in Yorkshire and was aged around 14, she went to a live show - I think it was a disco type show - which Jimmy Savile presented. Afterwards, he got talking to her and arranged to meet her later that night.

She did not keep the appointment, because she felt uncomfortable about it and about him.

As anyone who knows me well will tell you, I have a terrible memory, so treat the next memory with sympathy.

At vaguely around the same time I vaguely remember being told another story about Jimmy Savile.

He knew a family with a young daughter. The parents were going away for the night and they asked him to look after their teenage, under-age, daughter. He did not ask then, they asked him and almost insisted. It was almost an honour for them. He had sex with her. They never knew.

So those are my two stories - three if you include the persistent rumours he was gay.

The two stories involving girls now sound as if they were true. The 'gay' rumours now sound like they might be untrue. I never particularly repeated the stories to anyone else because they were just that - stories, gossip, rumour. You hear a lot of gossip about a lot of people.

When I worked at London Weekend Television and at Granada TV, I peripherally encountered a major 'family entertainment' star (mostly associated with BBC programmes). I was told by people at both ITV stations that he was a well-know 'groper' of women. It was widely-known.

But it might not be true.

A friend told me about an Anglia TV executive who chased her lecherously round the board room table, grabbing at her. She was also grabbed-at by a prominent Labour Party politician on another occasion. I know those stories to be true because they were told to me first hand by one of the two people involved.

In that sense, they are stories but not rumours.

At the weekend, someone was telling me that a particular macho British actor and international movie star is gay. I took it to be true because the person who told me knows her gossip. But it is just gossip, just rumour.

Everybody with an ear to the gossip 'knew' a few years ago that Prime Minister John Major was having an affair with caterer Clare Latimer.

The whole of Fleet Street 'knew'. It was widely hinted at. Media folk 'knew' all about the affair. I 'knew'. Scallywag magazine - which printed stories even Private Eye would not touch - published pieces about it.

In 1992, the band Soho even included a track called Claire's Kitchen on their album Thug. The lyrics referred to the affair without naming John Major.

It was only in 1993, when the New Statesmen printed the story, that John Major and Clare Latimer sued both the New Statesman and Scallywag.

Much later, in 2002, it turned out he had not been having an affair with caterer Clare Latimer at all, but with fellow Tory MP Edwina Currie - and it only came out then because she mentioned it in her autobiography.

Yet the gossip about the Claire's Kitchen affair had been as strong and 'known to be as true' as the current long-running gossip about two US actor Scientologists being gay.

But they might not be.

It is just a rumour.

And let us not even mention the stories about a British Prime Minister being gay or another one having a foreign affair.

As it 'appens, the rumours about Jimmy Savile were true but they were unprintable because they would not 'stand up' in a court or even in a newspaper article, let alone in any BBC investigation. There are all sorts of rumours about all sorts of people. If you are famous, it comes with the territory.

So it is a bit rich when national newspapers blame the BBC for not 'outing' Jimmy Savile as a paedophile in the decades when those same newspapers were running 'Our Kindly Saint Jimmy' stories but also knew the widespread rumours. Why did they not publish the stories if they 'knew' they were true?

The answer is because they did not know beyond gossip. Nor did the BBC.

Now we do.

Mostly.