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Why is Taxpayers' Money Being Spent Helping Policemen Become Comics?

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We are in an economic recession. Even without that, life is tough enough for the aspiring stand-up comedian without policemen trying to muscle their way into the act.

Yesterday, the Metropolitan Police's Assistant Commissioner John Yates and former Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman were questioned by the House of Commons' Home Affairs Select Committee about the fact they had claimed there was nothing to investigate when News International papers were accused of phone hacking.

In 2009, John Yates carried out an 'investigation' into a previous 2006 phone hacking investigation. His 'in-depth' investigation lasted a whole eight hours (presumably including a lunch break) after which he decided there was nothing to investigate.

He had not bothered to examine several bin bags of incriminating paperwork seized from the home of private detective Glenn Mulcaire nor read the 11,000 pages of evidence held inside Scotland Yard which included the fact that both future Prime Minister Gordon Brown and future Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne had been hacked.

His defence yesterday for what, on the face of it, was a breathtaking lack of investigation was that he could not investigate the allegations against News International properly because News International would not co-operate with him.

This is a bit like saying that the police could not investigate the Yorkshire Ripper killings because the Yorkshire Ripper would not send them information incriminating himself. If I ever commit a major bank robbery, I would want John Yates to be the investigating officer.

John Yates is Scotland Yard's new head of counter-terrorism and Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson says that Yates "currently undertakes one of the most difficult jobs in UK policing and is doing an outstanding job leading our fight against terrorism."

I don't know if I am alone in finding that this - far from reassuring me - makes me feel even more uneasy and unsafe. Presumably he would have difficulty investigating a planned terrorist attack if al-Qaida did not co-operate with his investigations.

We value tradition in Britain. The Metropolitan Police appear to be continuing a long tradition of being staffed by would-be dodgy double-glazing salesmen. Though I have to be careful because I would not want to be sued for defamation by dodgy double-glazing salesmen who might object to being compared to the Met.

Andy Hayman - whom Commons committee member Lorraine Fullbrook called "a dodgy geezer" - was in charge of the original phone hacking enquiry at the Met.

While 'investigating' the accusations against News International papers of phone hacking, Hayman (who had wanted to be a journalist when he was younger) had dinners with News International executives (one wonders if he would have dinners with bank robbers while investigating alleged bank robberies) and, on retiring from the Met after reported 'controversy about his expenses', he was given work by News International - writing for The Times.

An article in today's Independent describes the Hogarthian scene in the House of Commons' committee room yesterday:

When Ms Fullbrook asked him (Andy Hayman) whether he'd ever taken money from a paper in return for information, he threw his arms into the air, as in a Feydeau farce: "I can't believe you asked that!" And: "I can't let you get away with that! Taking money?" He was gasping; speechless; eyes bulging. Julian Huppert had observed mildly: "Other policemen have." Hayman cried something about his integrity and seemed on the point of scrabbling at his chest. The whole room was laughing - at, not with; scornful, down-the-rabbit-hole laughter at a figure who not long ago was defending 90 days of detention without charge. He was, in Keith Vaz's words: "More Clouseau than Columbo."

Last week, the London Evening Standard claimed that "Assistant Commissioners Andy Hayman and John Yates were both scared the News of the World would expose them for allegedly cheating on their wives if they asked difficult questions of the Sunday tabloid."

Previously, Labour MP Tom Watson had used parliamentary privilege to say: "John Yates's review of the (private detective Glenn) Mulcaire evidence was not an oversight. Like Andy Hayman, he chose not to act, he misled parliament."

In a blog back in February, I mentioned that Margaret Thatcher's solicitor - a partner in a major law firm - once told me he would never put a Metropolitan Police officer in the witness stand without corroborating evidence because you could never be certain a Met officer was telling the truth.

Likewise, the owner of a prominent detective agency who employs ex-SAS troopers etc, told me he never employs ex-policemen because you can never trust them.

I am not particularly outraged that the News of the World was hacking into people's phones - they allegedly bugged both John Yates and Andy Hayman's phones while the dynamic duo were allegedly investigating the News of the World for phone hacking - I am not even surprised that a policeman was flogging the Royal Family's personal phone and contact details if he was paid enough - but I am outraged that the taxpayer appears to be footing the bill for policeman apparently attempting to build their performance skills for a future career in stand-up comedy should this 'police job thing' not work out.