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Against All Odds

13/02/2015 15:10 GMT | Updated 14/04/2015 10:59 BST

This week I read the tragic news about food blogger Wilkes McDermid, who threw himself off the roof terrace of a London restaurant in a planned suicide. In his 'goodbye' blog post, he stated that he was simply 'accelerating Darwinism', as a 39-year-old Asian man, doomed to be alone forever. He'd conducted some informal research over a number of years that indicated women prefer Caucasian or black men over Asians, and if not, then they would almost certainly be tall and/or wealthy Asians. McDermid maintains he couldn't control his romantic life but he could put an end to his suffering.

What an unbelievably tragic state of being. To take oneself out of the running, off the face of the earth because you believe you will never find love. At this time of year, as we approach Valentine's Day, I'm sure there are so many people thinking similar thoughts, but of those who say they've given up on love, most don't actually believe it in their heart of hearts. There is always a glimmer of hope, right?

What has struck me about this story is the science behind it. When I left my marriage four years ago, I had no idea that science had anything to do with partner-finding. Call me a romantic, but I've always laboured under the idea of being so struck by another person that any consideration of current life situation, age, job, looks - whatever - would go by the wayside. I've scoffed when people said, 'maybe the time wasn't right' about a particular guy I've dated, and I've thought, 'if the connection is right, who gives a fuck about the timing?!'

Isn't that what's glorious about love? The inconvenience of it? That it pushes every other consideration out of the way?

What I discovered was that suddenly, everything was all about the timing. Well-meaning friends told me I had to be 'on the same page' as someone, at the right life stage, to make a go of it. After my marriage, I'd had a ridiculously inconvenient year-long passionate love affair with someone ten years younger than me, but in the end, he'd thrown 'timing' back at me: a ten-year age gap is fine in your thirties and forties, he'd said, but not so good in your sixties and seventies. WTF? I thought we didn't give a shit about that. Apparently 'we' did.

Since then, I have learned to accept certain unexpected facts about dating in my forties. Firstly, that men my age aren't relieved to finally find a single, independent woman of their own age who doesn't want children. They are frequently at the stage where they want the option of creating a Mini Me, if they haven't already got one.

No, men my age are still searching in the twenty-five to thirty-five age bracket, and I can't really blame them, if they still want children. I'm always honest about my age online - forty-seven - and my profile only really attracts much older or younger men. And let me reassure you now, that in no way am I complaining about the latter.

Online, people are cast aside for simply not fitting a desired profile - not being the right age, height, weight, race, religion or not having the right job, location or marital status. This makes me think that online dating isn't for me. Why would I want a partner who was judging me on a set of statistics? I want someone who will catch my eye on a train, a beach, in a bank or a checkout queue and want to get to know me. Just me, standing there, no statistics hanging on a board around my neck with a mugshot.

I don't want the science of it, I want the randomness of it and I will always believe that is out there for me. And if he is shorter than I thought he would be, hasn't got the 'right' job, is age- or religion-inappropriate I won't give a shit about it. There will be a connection between both of us that no one else can see - they won't be able to work out the science behind it because it will be beyond analysis and data.

I believe that if you are only looking for a socially approved relationship then you are working within a very narrow dating channel. You will only properly 'see' age-appropriate people with the right height/weight/job/hair colour ratio. If you look beyond a tick-box life, as I do, you will find that like-minded people see you. There are fewer of them, but the recognition of another soul with the same outlook is a moment to treasure.

I'd rather wait for one single moment like that than tick any boxes, even if the odds are seemingly stacked against us.

First published on http://becauseicanblog.com/2015/02/10/against-all-odds/