Conservation

Why Visiting a Rainforest Might Just Save the World

Ella Jameson | Posted 02.12.2014 | UK
Ella Jameson

While hordes of tourists with cameras swarming through rainforests is also obviously not what we want, the more people understand these incredible ecosystems, whether through actually visiting themselves or learning proactively, the better.

Tigers vs Chinese Medicine - Can Tourism Swing the Fight?

Justin Francis | Posted 20.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Justin Francis

There are only around 3000 tigers left in the wild worldwide. To put this into context that's less than the number of tigers in captivity in the US - a figure and comparison that I find shocking.

Cetaceans, Captures, Culture and Celebration in Quito

Mark Simmonds OBE | Posted 13.11.2014 | UK
Mark Simmonds OBE

Days ago, from a conference center perched on the edge of the bustling mountain city of Quito, Ecuador, delegates to the Convention on Migratory Species made an urgent and unprecedented call to end the live capture of whales and dolphins. This is the first time that any international body has called for this cruel and unnecessary threat to cetaceans to end.

Where Conservation Meets the Sea

Mark Simmonds OBE | Posted 30.10.2014 | UK
Mark Simmonds OBE

An estimated 6.4 million tonnes of marine litter is dumped in oceans every year. In hotspots more than 3.5 million pieces of litter can occur per square kilometre. Plastic, which constitutes between 60 and 80 percent of marine debris, does not biodegrade and can persist in the marine environment for hundreds to thousands of years.

What Has Science Got to Do With the Mary Rose?

Simon M. Clabby | Posted 13.12.2014 | UK Tech
Simon M. Clabby

Last Saturday was the 32nd Anniversary of the Mary Rose's raising from the Solent seabed, which took place on the 11 October 1982 and was broadcast live across the world. We asked the Mary Rose Museum's Conservation Manager Dr Eleanor Schofield the question - what has science got to do with the Mary Rose?

The Amazing Legacy of Gerald Durrell

Rebecca Williams | Posted 12.12.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Rebecca Williams

The Dodo is one of the most well known birds in the world, although it's been extinct for several hundred years. Gerald chose the bird as a logo to remind us all of the importance of the conservation work that goes on in his name and how very fragile some species are and there are reminders of the bird everywhere.

Volunteer in Space

Frontier | Posted 10.12.2014 | UK Tech
Frontier

Space exploration has come to the forefront of the public's interest in recent years with success stories coming from all over the world. As well as the recent successes reported by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, the European Space Agency boast an impressive track record and is the world leader in environmental research into the ozone layer.

Privatising Underwater Tourism to the Titanic

Phil Pauley | Posted 09.12.2014 | UK
Phil Pauley

Imagine being able to book an overnight trip to visit this most famous of sunken shipwrecks, or 'fly' over the bubbling hydrothermal vents deep in the Mariana Trench, where only a handful of humans have explored before.

How This Chilling Video Ended A £70m Partnership

The Huffington Post UK | Charlotte Meredith | Posted 09.10.2014 | UK

Following an emotional campaign that pulled heartstrings worldwide, the much-loved toy company Lego has bowed to public demands and axed its long-stan...

What the Wild Means to Me

Daniel Crockett | Posted 29.11.2014 | UK
Daniel Crockett

I consider my relationship with nature as a long and unfolding conversation, like learning a language that I can never master. And this conversation is never dull. Like most discourses, it only improves with time and age, to reach a point where a constant connection evolves and grows, with almost daily realisations.

Can Science Fiction Drive Social Change?

Phil Pauley | Posted 23.11.2014 | UK Entertainment
Phil Pauley

I hope that my books - and whatever forms the stories may go on to take - will capture the imagination of their readers, create a vehicle for discussing environmental issues, and encourage young people to tackle global challenges by becoming the scientists and engineers of tomorrow.

Why You Shouldn't Swim With Baited Whale Sharks in the Philippines

Maria Sowter | Posted 20.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Maria Sowter

There's only one thing I can tell you about the town of Oslob in the Philippines: don't go. There is a tendency amongst travel bloggers to over romanticise, but I wouldn't want to lie to you.

One Of The Fastest And Most Dramatic Extinctions Ever Seen...

Huffington Post UK | Louise Ridley | Posted 01.09.2014 | UK

London Zoo will stop the clock on its Victorian bird house today at noon to mark 100 years since the death of a passenger pigeon called Martha. Mar...

Ecuador's Eco-Ethos Sets the Standard For Responsible Tourism - But Is It Under Threat?

Justin Francis | Posted 15.10.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Justin Francis

Ecuador's underlying ethos is a good one, one which could provide a blueprint of responsibility and sustainability for the rest of the world to follow. But as oil demands increase, the emphasis on environmental protection faces huge threats.

Lion Totally Steals The Show In This Video To Promote World Lion Day

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 08.08.2014 | UK Comedy

It's World Lion Day on 10 August - we know, it comes around earlier every year - and here's 'the lion whisperer' Kevin Richardson to tell us all about...

Three Things That We Can Learn About Sustainable Development From Madagascar

Laura Robson | Posted 01.10.2014 | UK
Laura Robson

What do you picture when you think of Madagascar? If it's not a scene from the infamous cartoon of the same name (complete with talking penguins), then it's most probably a nation ravaged by ecological disaster.

Teaching, Diving and Looking for Lemurs in Madagascar

Frontier | Posted 09.09.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Frontier

It took me a week to get used to the environment, as even though I liked the food, I struggled to eat much, though I soon got my appetite back to its usual size once I had adjusted to the climate and my malaria pills. Anyway despite my lack of energy I still enjoyed the quick intro into PADI (I found that I was at a slight advantage as I had already started working through the book).

Greenpeace Have Made The Most Upsetting Lego Film Ever

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 22.07.2014 | UK Tech

Greenpeace has made a shocking/touching/impactful/sad video about Lego's partnership with Shell and it's fair to say that it pretty much squashes any ...

Cheerleader Has Great Defence For Shooting Rare African Animals

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK

Kendall Jones, the cheerleader who shoots rare African animals and posts the pictures to Facebook, has hit back at her critics, insisting killing the ...

Tigers About the House: Cute But Sending the Wrong Message?

Philip Mansbridge | Posted 25.08.2014 | UK
Philip Mansbridge

Last week millions tuned in to watch the BBC's Tigers About the House, featuring British born Giles Clark, a zoo keeper from Australia Zoo in Queensland. Mass 'awws', 'ooohs' and smiles filled the nation as tiger cubs Spot and Stripe playfully and rather adorably fed from the hands of their carer at home.

Volunteer Stories: Marine Conservation and Diving in Tanzania

Frontier | Posted 24.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Frontier

I chose the Frontier Tanzania Marine Conservation and Diving project as I am already a PADI Divemaster and very passionate about diving. I really wanted to take part in a project which incorporated this and also let me expand my knowledge of the marine world.

Endangered Species - Oh How Things Have Changed... Or Not

Philip Mansbridge | Posted 15.07.2014 | UK
Philip Mansbridge

Care for the Wild is 30 years old this year, and has spent three decades trying to rescue, protect and defend wildlife. Like many others, we've fought hard to stop animals becoming extinct. Surely after all that time and effort, the battle should have been won by now? Apparently not.

The Multiple Challenges for Global Food Security

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 30.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Professor Gilligan was speaking on Global Food Security at a Gates Conversation earlier this week. The session was part of a new series of academic conversations that allow Gates Cambridge Scholars to interact with leading thinkers on major issues spanning a variety of disciplines.

Why Volunteers Are Vital to Conservation Research Projects

Frontier | Posted 08.06.2014 | UK
Frontier

When volunteers come out to conservation projects they like to get involved with surveys in the hope of seeing interesting animals. But volunteers don't always realise where the data they are helping to collect goes.

Volunteer Stories: Teaching, Diving and Wildlife in Madagascar

Frontier | Posted 02.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Frontier

Madagascar is a place like no other. I never knew much about it until I stumbled over the Madagascar Teaching, Wildlife and Diving project on the Frontier website. I don't really know why I chose that project, it just happened. Next thing I knew I was on the plane to Nosy Be.