South Sudan

South Sudan's Leaders Must Do More to End Crisis

Lynne Featherstone | Posted 12.09.2014 | UK Politics
Lynne Featherstone

While the eyes of the world rightly look towards global crises in Iraq, Syria, Gaza, Ukraine and West Africa, there is a serious and worsening humanitarian disaster almost going unnoticed in South Sudan. It is deeply saddening to see a country that was once so full of hope for the future, now embroiled in such a painful and destructive war with itself. When I first visited South Sudan less than two years ago I was struck by the optimism and hope that filled the air but today it is an entirely different story.

To the Leaders of South Sudan: Look Into Your Heart and Ask for Forgiveness for the Things You've Done

Aimee Ansari | Posted 09.09.2014 | UK
Aimee Ansari

Before this conflict started in December, there was no inspiring and unifying vision of what South Sudan could be. The hope and optimism that came with independence is gone. Instead, there is now fear, mistrust and disillusionment between the people of South Sudan. An amazing opportunity has been squandered. It may take years to re-build a sense of unity.

South Sudan's Invisible Children

Saul Guerrero | Posted 08.09.2014 | UK
Saul Guerrero

From UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon to Hollywood A-lister Keira Knightley - the world has begun talking about the impending food crisis in South Sudan. And with good reason. We can now deliver a humanitarian response that was unavailable in the famines of the 1980s and 1990s.

World Humanitarian Day! Remembering the Brave

Unni Krishnan | Posted 20.08.2014 | UK
Unni Krishnan

In a world where close to a billion people go to hungry, is there a choice not to be humanitarian?

Why I Keep Being an Aid Worker Despite the Dangers

Johan Eldebo | Posted 19.08.2014 | UK
Johan Eldebo

Every day the news seems to suggest the World is getting scarier and more dangerous. Iraq, Gaza, Syria, South Sudan - the list goes on. For me reading the news is never a shock. I spend my working life immersed in the horrors, the violence and the poverty that blight the globe.

From Refugee to Aid Worker - Reflections From the Frontline of Response in War Torn South Sudan

Joseph Ngamije | Posted 19.08.2014 | UK
Joseph Ngamije

When I was 11 years old, I was forced to become a refugee in my own country, Rwanda. I could see how innocent children and mothers suffered from a conflict they have never started. People died including my own brother. Innocent children were massacred. From then on, I developed a spirit of giving justice to those who are helpless, giving a voice to the voiceless, giving protection to the most vulnerable.

Rising Tide of Humanitarian Crises Demand More Than Aid

Mark Goldring | Posted 01.08.2014 | UK
Mark Goldring

This is not just a humanitarian imperative; it is in all our interests to act. In the globalised 21st Century conflicts are not easily contained by borders. As the Stern Review made clear, tackling climate change will ultimately be cheaper than allowing it to proceed unchecked. But it is the human cost of these crises, the children of Gaza, the homeless Philippines and the South Sudanese families who do not know where their next meal is coming from that really demand our action. The UK public have shown they are up to the task; it is time for world leaders to do likewise.

South Sudan - Children Swim in the Fetid Water as They Have Nowhere Else to Play

Barbara Jackson | Posted 29.09.2014 | UK
Barbara Jackson

I am very proud of CARE's work in Bentiu, but it is not enough. We need to do so much more - it is our obligation, our commitment, and it is the right of the people of South Sudan to receive our and other support at this critical time.

South Sudan Is Locked in a Cycle of Violence

Elizabeth Ashamu Deng | Posted 10.09.2014 | UK
Elizabeth Ashamu Deng

On 9 July, South Sudan will mark three years as an independent state. But the growing pains of the world's newest country are evident as millions are trapped in a vicious cycle of violence. Amnesty International's Elizabeth Ashamu Deng looks at some of the problems facing South Sudan today.

Who Is Really Paying the Price of Fighting in South Sudan?

Luol Deng | Posted 08.09.2014 | UK Sport
Luol Deng

I know what it's like to lose your childhood to war. When I was five and conflict raged in Sudan, my family and I were amongst the lucky ones to leave for Egypt. Four years later we were granted asylum in the United Kingdom. Inspired by legendary South Sudanese basketball player Manute Bol, my siblings and I took up basketball which helped us fit in. Like Manute, I was lucky enough to turn the sport I loved into a career as a professional NBA player in the United States.

Jessica Elgot

As Old As Their Country, These South Sudan Children Only Know A Life Of War And Hunger

HuffingtonPost.com | Jessica Elgot | Posted 09.07.2014 | UK

For these six children, who are the same age as their country, their short lives have been fraught with violence, hunger and sickness. Three years ...

World Refugee Day: Shameful That Tens of Thousands of Children in South Sudan Could Die From Lack of Food

Rose Caldwell | Posted 20.08.2014 | UK
Rose Caldwell

Almost a million people have been forced to leave their homes in South Sudan following months of violent conflict. Over one million are displaced and dispersed in hard to reach areas in the country, and over 350,000 more have fled South Sudan for refuge in neighbouring nations.

Despite War and Famine, Young People in South Sudan Have Not Given Up

Mary Suat | Posted 19.08.2014 | UK
Mary Suat

When I was born, 18 years ago, my country did not exist. Sudan and South Sudan were all one big nation, the largest in Africa, but already there was always fighting between the south and the rest. My family left our home in Akobo state, one of the most violent areas and moved to Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, which was much safer.

Time to Put the Spotlight on South Sudan

David Bull | Posted 29.07.2014 | UK
David Bull

South Sudan's children are suffering - and the crisis is set to get worse - much worse - in the coming months if more action is not taken urgently. The world's newest nation is on the brink of devastation with a brutal conflict destroying hundreds of thousands of lives and a growing humanitarian emergency putting the entire future of the country and its children in jeopardy. The United Nations Secretary General has predicted that by the end of this year, an incredible half of South Sudan's 12million people will be either in flight, facing starvation, or dead. At least half of these will be children.

To Speak Plainly: Obstetric Fistula

Sarah Kessler | Posted 22.07.2014 | UK
Sarah Kessler

"It is absolutely devastating. When they get undressed for medical exams you will see they're wearing so many layers, plus plastic wrapped around them. The smell is so overwhelming some people can't go into the same room."

Money, Peace and Children - Inseparable to Stop a Catastrophe in South Sudan

Unni Krishnan | Posted 20.07.2014 | UK
Unni Krishnan

Who said children don't vote? Well, they don't cast their votes by standing in long lines and on ballet papers, but they cast their votes from under-funded relief camps and feeding centres and ill equipped schools and hospitals. Every hungry child is a vote of non-confidence on humanity. I hope the donors don't ignore them.

Fragile States: Boosting Community Systems for an Effective Health Response

Dr Alvaro Bermejo | Posted 16.07.2014 | UK Politics
Dr Alvaro Bermejo

Consider for a moment some of the countries currently making the news and the challenges that lie ahead in rebuilding infrastructures and services disrupted by internal conflict, chronic violence and protracted crisis: the Central African Republic, Somalia, South Sudan, Afghanistan...

'We Are All Displaced Now' - South Sudanese Health Workers Tell of Treating Patients in the Bush

Nicole Johnston | Posted 16.07.2014 | UK
Nicole Johnston

As the international community holds its breath, hoping that the latest peace deal signed between warring parties in South Sudan holds, civilians caught up in the conflict are praying for an end to the killings, for the chance to return home and to plant their crops.

Sleepless in South Sudan

Aimee Ansari | Posted 02.07.2014 | UK
Aimee Ansari

I smelled the decaying bodies in Haiti after the earthquake and I got ill because of the terrible fumes of the dead buried under buildings in Lebanon after the bombings. That was nothing compared to the massacres and violence happening in South Sudan now. I won't go into the details; they're too gory, too much everything.

No News From Malakal

Agus Morales | Posted 16.06.2014 | UK
Agus Morales

Life has disappeared from Malakal, a key town in oil-rich Upper Nile state, South Sudan. The clashes between government and opposition forces have turned Malakal, a square grid bordering the river Nile, into a ghost town. But some people didn't manage to escape - they were forced to witness the horror.

I Love South Sudan

James Elder | Posted 11.06.2014 | UK
James Elder

Nyatut fled her village in South Sudan two months ago. Armed men burnt her home and killed her mother. From Syria to Central Africa Republic to S...

In 25 Years as an Aid Worker I Have Never Witnessed This

Judy Leigh-Moore | Posted 10.06.2014 | UK
Judy Leigh-Moore

I have been an aid worker for over 25 years. In that time I've witnessed and experienced events and horrors that are beyond most people's imaginations. But I don't think I have ever felt the mixture of emotions that hit me recently as I boarded a tiny plane to take me out of the city of Malakal in South Sudan, back to the relative safety of the capital Juba.

Forgotten Crisis: Why Aren't We Talking About South Sudan?

Sir Nick Young | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK
Sir Nick Young

Reports of continued fighting in South Sudan are worrying. But even more distressing is how little attention this humanitarian crisis is generating. Let us not underestimate the scale of the crisis in the world's newest nation.

South Sudan: Give Peace (and Children) a Chance!

Unni Krishnan | Posted 07.05.2014 | UK
Unni Krishnan

In a group of 100 children, singing, playing and some crying, two girls stand out. Their names are Madiha, 9, and Lina, 4. It is not their unusual silence that catches my attention, but the way they frequently hug each other, often involuntarily...

Reflections on South Sudan

Tony Baldry | Posted 23.04.2014 | UK Politics
Tony Baldry

One would have thought that the international community, including the UN, the US and the EU, would have been swift to have condemned a failed coup d'état, i.e. the seeking of seizing power and control of the country by the barrel of a gun rather than through the ballot box.