english literature

Twenty-three days ago, I completed a degree in English Literature with Creative Writing. Apologies to any medics out there who still have two months of library toil ahead - your time will come!
The Complete University Guide has released the top ten universities to study English for 2014-2015. The website ranks the
The suggestion that young people can only engage with 'accessible texts' such as Caitlin Moran's Twitter feed and Russell Brand's testimony on drug use to a House of Commons committee is inexcusably patronising.
No less valuable are the helpful directions at the end of each chapter on how to get to the places by the most convenient and time-saving route.
I pity anyone out there who happened to come across the BBC's serialisation of Death Comes to Pemberley without first having read Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.
Anaphora, synaesthesia, pentameter... you learn some tantalisingly useless words during an English degree. I would recommend English to anyone; you get to quilt adjectives, mash up clauses, make sentences swagger and phrases pop like fireworks.
I rarely meet people who share my bittersweet obsession with both Shakespeare and Dostoevsky. So when I do, the elation is boundless. That's what made me gasp as I was looking through the contents of The Demonic: Literature and Experience, newly published by Routledge.
Perhaps, as the bicentennial year draws to a close and we move into Dickens' third century, there is something else the Victorian author can teach us - and that is not to teach him to our children.
Many graduates will return home for good in search of work and find themselves facing up to the grim reality of unemployment, a term synonymous with notions of failure and despair, and about as far removed from the joy of a graduation ceremony as you can get.