suzanne moore

The woman is the third trans person in months to walk out of the newspaper – this time over a controversial column by Suzanne Moore.
The ramifications of dividing up toys, activities, colours and clothing according to gender, is that if children don't like the things they're "supposed to," they're treated as if there's something wrong with them.
I was pleased to be among the few hundred people that gathered in the Camden Centre for Stand Up and Spit: The Big One, which
Having just seen Virgins Sex Pistols inspired credit cards and then dragging my eyes through and article about pop 'rivals' Katy Perry and Taylor Swift writing vaguely pissy songs at each other, Kate Moss has saved my laptop from being coated with vomit. Thank you Kate for being a bit naughty, a bit rock 'n' roll.
Benetton's new global advert campaign features a disabled and Brazillian transgender model as part of a bid to "fight against
What really worries me here is that a self-confessed feminist is actually resorting to the same tactics used by the likes of Ann Coulter and Nick Griffin to justify her hateful beliefs.
Transgender people might be one of the last oppressed minorities. If Ms Burchill's rant had been directed against black or Asian people, homosexual people, Jews, or Muslims, I am pretty sure it would have been met with the full force of the law.
For anyone not yet acquainted with MooreBurchillTransGate (it's catchy!), a summary of the offense taken reads as follows
Transphobic remarks from Julie Burchill in her Observer piece include talk about having nuts taken off because "its all most of them are fit to do", 'their relationship with their phantom limb" and various references to cutting things off and "expecting" privilege - I can't picture the situation in which the editor thought these were all reasonable, measured and insightful things to say...
The main concern here is that in a recent article in the Observer, Burchill suggests that transgender women don't have the right to talk about being women or to complain or to compare themselves to other women...
Adamski and I are at the supermarket on Wednesday evening. We're about to have tagliatelle at his gaff, so we're here for fresh Parmesan and napkins. He's flummoxed and indecisive at the remarkable range of serviettes on offer, including the special edition, Diamond Jubilee Union Jack jobs.
The Times on Saturday described Keira Knightley as 'the cinema equivalent of Marmite'. Whether you admire or admonish her acting skills, editors seemed united about one thing this week: the British starlet makes for a rather more glamorous front-page photo than the riot splashes and Libya pictures of August. Seemingly starved of upbeat, positive things to write about, the British press looked to Venice this week and its A-list-littered film festival. Not, of course, that every article filed from the red carpets was positive.