umbrella movement

Prominent pro-democracy activists Joshua Wong, Andy Chain and Agnes Chow were arrested in Hong Kong on Thursday and Friday. Wong, one of the leaders of the so-called Umbrella Movement in 2014, was arrested on suspicion of organising illegal protests, despite not being a prominent figure in recent demonstrations. A pro-democracy march planned for Saturday was cancelled after police refused permission for it to take place.
Fifty-two days after the main Umbrella Movement 'occupy' camp was cleared, Hong Kong protesters returned to the streets on Sunday for a pro-democracy rally. Organisers say 13,000 took part, whilst police estimated that 6,600 were present.
Police dismantled the final umbrella movement protest encampment in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong on Tuesday morning. Traffic was restored around lunchtime as police made 20 arrests. After 79 days of protest, pro-democracy demonstrators were given 30 minutes to pack up and leave. Most left the area, but around 17 people remained at a sit-in awaiting arrest.
A day after one of Hong Kong's three pro-democracy protest camps was cleared by police and bailiffs, hundreds of pro-democracy activists returned to Mong Kok's main shopping thoroughfare on Thursday evening. Instead of erecting tents, activists convened to collectively watch movie trailers and adverts on a cinema billboard.
At least 80 people were arrested, according to police, as part of one of Hong Kong's pro-democracy protest camps was cleared on Tuesday. Bailiffs were on site to enforce a court order to clear obstructions from a relatively small part of the encampment on the Kowloon Peninsula. Most of the clearance was performed by an agency with bailiffs and police on hand to assist.
Dozens of protesters gathered at the British consulate in Hong Kong on Friday demanding that Britain does more to prevent China influencing elections in the city.
The main Umbrella Movement 'Occupy' site in Hong Kong received an unusual visitor, on Friday, in the form of a Kim Jong-Un impersonator.
'Umbrella Movement' activists in Hong Kong clashed with riot police on Tuesday evening in an attempt to expand an area near the city's government headquarters currently being occupied by pro-democracy demonstrators.
In the run-up to Hong Kong's occupation protests, the initiators of the movement were called "radicals" and "extremists" and their actions dubbed "terrorism". Yet the young people peacefully demonstrating for universal suffrage across the city have won hearts and minds across the world in what amounts to a meticulous reading of peaceful dissent. By putting the "civil" in "civil disobedience", these young protesters have already won an important moral victory, no matter what happens next.