waste

The Swadlincote adventure is launched on Wednesday 27th January and the year ahead promises to be intriguing. If all goes well it could be the Derbyshire town does revolutionise the way the UK address food waste.
In an attempt to refine the information overload, I have picked the articles that I think are most engaging; voices that will both inspire and anger; brands worthy of attention; and concepts that will encourage reflection on this industry and how we interact with it. Here are the five topics that dominated the discussion:
From claiming agricultural subsidies for a motocross track as 'arable land' to the curious case of the non-functioning sewerage system in Greece, this year's Court of Auditors' report shows that the European Union remains rotten to the core.
Selfridges has announced it will stop selling single-use plastic water bottles as part of a campaign to reduce pollution
Sixty Young Greens have been invited to camp on Pennard Hill. Our task: create a series of camping villages, live sustainably within them, and encourage members of the public to join us and do the same.
'From a Mother to Another' is a new campaign that helps parents play a small part in creating a better future for their children. It makes it easy for parents to donate high quality unwanted baby and children's clothing to families in the UK who are most in need.
Later today we will find out for sure if the European Commission is planning on scrapping two vital European laws. When the commission presents it's full 2015 work programme this afternoon it looks very likely that the 'clean air' and 'circular economy (waste)' packages will both be withdrawn.
The difficulty with food waste is that its real environmental damage is created through its production, not its disposal. It's hard to connect wasting food with the damage it causes, because by the time it's on your plate, the damage has already been done.
So make your contribution to zero waste week a double whammy. Eat real, fresh foods and cut out highly packaged junk foods, takeaways and soft drinks. It's a win/win situation, you lose inches from your waist and you cut down on waste.
We Brits are trigger happy when it comes to throwing out food - according to a 2013 report we throw about £700 worth of food