Will Quince

HuffPost UK witnessed a Tory candidate break the news to voters
If Theresa May was hoping for an instant bounce after her social care funding u-turn, she got in Colchester. Tory candidate
The father of a stillborn baby has attacked Labour for its “disgusting” claim that mothers and babies will die if the Tories
The past week or so in Copeland has seen a Labour campaign that has made me angry and sad in equal measure. To see a mainstream political party - a party I respected - run a campaign quoting from unnamed midwifes saying 'mothers will die, babies will die, babies will be brain damaged' is simply disgusting.
Grief is an individual journey. It is for Jen and it is for me, even though our journeys are so closely entwined. But with the support of our wonderful family and friends, as well as our simply amazing bereavement counsellor we took tentative steps each day.
There is no question that a miscarriage or the death of a baby are very difficult subjects to talk about. We don't like talking about death let alone the death of a baby. However it is only by talking about miscarriage, stillbirth and neo-natal death that we can start to address the underlying issues and causes and importantly ensure that the appropriate bereavement care is in place to support those who sadly lose a baby.
Thinking about the parents of children over six months old, why should they not have the same protection in law as those that lose a baby under six months old? Upon losing a baby, the bereaved mother and father are entitled to full maternity and paternity leave. But if you were to lose an older child? Nothing. Surely this cannot be right.
Perhaps I am being naïve, perhaps British politics is too polarised and perhaps we will always be fighting across the political divide. But surely we can be civilised? Surely we can be respectful? Surely we can drop the name calling and the labelling as liars.
When I think of the people we grieve for, I'm always reminded of a quote from John Green's novel, Looking For Alaska, that seems to sum up my feelings on the subject: "Thomas Edison's last words were "It's very beautiful over there." I don't know where there is, but I believe it's somewhere, and I hope it's beautiful."