The newly-elected president of Egypt, Mohammed Morsi, has been quoted by the Iranian semi-state run news agency Fars as wanting to strengthen relations between the two countries.

According to an interview with Fars, Morsi, who was elected as president after his party, the Muslim Brotherhood, won on Sunday, will try to become closer to Tehran after three decades of icy relations.

Morsi reportedly said that "part of my agenda is the development of ties between Iran and Egypt that will create a strategic balance in the region," in an interview that Fars say will be published at a later date.

Fars claim that Morsi was speaking only hours before he was named the victor in the election, beating former dictator Hosni Mubarak's ex-prime minister Ahmed Shafiq with 51.7 percent of the runoff vote – a margin of only 800,000 votes.

mohammad morsi

Thousands lined the streets after Morsi's victory, filling Tahrir Square

However, reports later on Monday suggested that the newly-elected president had not given any such indication to Fars.

"Mr Morsi did not give any interview to Fars and everything that this agency has published is without foundation," a spokesman for the Egyptian presidency told the official news agency MENA, reported AFP.

As the first Islamist to earn the presidency of Egypt, Morsi may have more natural inclination for creating a more cooperative dialogue with Iran, which in turn could threaten the political balance between Iran, Egypt and Israel.

The two countries have had no ties since the early 1980s, and relations between Israel and Iran have intensified the latter began its controversial nuclear program.

Hundreds of thousands crowded the streets and the now infamous Tahrir Square in celebration after Morsi was elected president on Sunday.

The 60-year-old's victory came one and a half years after the bloody upheaval of Hosni Mubarak's rule, and he called it "splendid vision of democracy" that represented the beginning of an "Islamic Awakening".

Updated: 19:12, 25 June 2012, with Egyptian government denial

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  • An Egyptian supporter of new president-e

    An Egyptian supporter of new president-elect, Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi, waves his national flags as he chants slogans in Cairo's Tahrir square on June 24, 2012. Tens of thousands packed into Tahrir Square in the largest celebration the protest hub has witnessed since Hosni Mubarak's ouster, to celebrate Morsi winning Egypt's presidential elections. AFP PHOTO/MARWAN NAAMANI (Photo credit should read MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Egyptian youth celebrate as they drive t

    Egyptian youth celebrate as they drive towards Cairo's Tahrir Square, on June 24, 2012. Tens of thousands pack into Tahrir Square in the largest celebration the protest hub has witnessed since Hosni Mubarak's ouster, to celebrate their new president-elect, Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi. AFP PHOTO/MARWAN NAAMANI (Photo credit should read MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Egyptian protesters celebrate the victory of presidential candidate Mohammed Morsi in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

  • Egyptians pray as to celebrate the victo

    Egyptians pray as to celebrate the victory of Muslim Brotherhood member Mohamed Morsi in the national elections, on June 24, 2012, in Cairo's Tahrir Square. Morsi was declared the first president of Egypt since a popular uprising ousted Hosni Mubarak, beating Mubarak-era minister Ahmed Shafiq and capping a tumultuous and divisive military-led transition. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Fireworks light up the sky as Egyptians

    Fireworks light up the sky as Egyptians celebrate in Cairo's Tahrir Square the victory of Muslim Brotherhood member Mohamed Morsi in the national elections, on June 24, 2012. Morsi was declared the first president of Egypt since a popular uprising ousted Hosni Mubarak, beating Mubarak-era minister Ahmed Shafiq and capping a tumultuous and divisive military-led transition. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Tens of thousands of Egyptians pack into

    Tens of thousands of Egyptians pack into Cairo's Tahrir Square on June 24, 2012 in the largest celebration the protest hub has witnessed since Hosni Mubarak's ouster, to celebrate their new president-elect, Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi. Morsi won 51.73 percent of the vote in a deeply polarising run-off against Ahmed Shafiq, who was briefly Mubarak's premier during the ousted leader's final days in power. AFP PHOTO/MARWAN NAAMANI (Photo credit should read MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • An Egyptian waves a national flag over Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, to celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi, in the country's presidential election, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • Lebanese youth wave the Hamas and Syrian revolutionary flags as they celebrate the win of Mohammed Morsi, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zaatari)

  • Egyptians celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi in the country's presidential election, in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

  • Egyptian protesters celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi of the presidential election in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)

  • Egyptian protesters celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi of the presidential election in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Mohammed Morsi was declared Egypt's first Islamist president on Sunday after the freest elections in the country's history, narrowly defeating Hosni Mubarak's last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq in a race that raised political tensions in Egypt to a fever pitch. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)