Izz Ad-Din Al-Qassam Cyber Fighters Group Takes Break From Hacking Banks To Celebrate Eid Al-Adha Holiday

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The hackers want to see Innocence of Muslims removed from YouTube
The hackers want to see Innocence of Muslims removed from YouTube

A string of US banks, including Capital One, HSBC and Bank of America, have been hit by denial-of-service attacks recently - but luckily, the Muslim hacktivist group responsible is taking a break to celebrate a religious holiday.

Izz Ad-Din Al-Qassam Cyber Fighters Group issued a statement on website Pastebin, saying that their operations would be suspended for Eid al-Adha, which this year begins on the sunset of Friday 26 October.

In a message posted on Tuesday the hackers said: "Due to approaching Eid al-Adha and to commemorate this breezy and blessing day, we will stop our attack operations."

This is good news for numerous UK, French and Israeli banks, which have had also threats made against them, according to an industry insider.

Justin Crump, CEO of security intelligence and risk management consultancy Sibylline, said the group "made a dent in some pretty big systems" but only caused the banks "a bit of stress" and that it was "a bit annoying", but didn't represent a particularly big threat.

The group launched ‘Operation Alababil’ as revenge for the anti-Islam YouTube film Innocence of Muslims, made by Egyptian-American Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, who lives in California.

The hackers argue that the film, which surfaced in July, was made by Western agencies and want it removed from YouTube.

They wrote: "Operation Alababil is revenge in response to the humiliation of the Organization of the Prophet of Islam (PBUH) by some Western countries."

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, however, said Washington had nothing to do with the video, which she called "disgusting and reprehensible".

The film caused caused widespread offence and violence across the Muslim world, with Iran temporarily blocking Google to stop its citizens viewing the footage.

Tony Blair described the violent reaction to the film as "absurd".