A German travel agency will run flights into the night sky to provide dramatic views of a comet about to pass over the Northern Hemisphere.

The comet Pan-STARRS is currently visible above the southern hemisphere, and is becoming brighter every day.

It is currently about 100 million miles from Earth, but is gradually approaching the Sun.

Astronomers say that by Thursday the comet will be visible in the northern hemisphere with the naked eye. Eagle-eyed viewers with a good vantage point will be able to see it in the low west-southwest horizon about 30 minutes after sunset.

On Sunday it will make its closest approach to the Sun's surface, leading it to shed ice and dust in a luminous streaming tail.

Eclipse Travel in Germany said it will make the most of the opportunity by selling 88 window seats on a commercial jet to get a better view.

The Boeing 737-700 will fly up to about 11,000 metres where the thinner air and lack of clouds means the view will be better than on the ground.

The cost of the two-hour flight will be about £310-400.

The comet Pan-STARRS was discovered in 2011 by the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, in Hawaii.

Meanwhile another comet - ISON - is still on course to make a dramatic sight in the sky later this year.

Already dubbed the 'Comet of the Century', some predictions say ISON will shine brighter than the Moon in the night sky and might even be visible during the day. It is set to arrive in August and will peak in late November - unless it breaks apart of flies off course beforehand.

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    A comet has been spotted that is predicted to shine brighter than the full moon, and make a pass near the sun towards the end of 2013. The discovery was made by the International Scientific Optical Network in Russia. Predictions regarding its brightness mean that the comet could be one of the most significant astronomical happenings in recent history.

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    Hale Bopp, the brightest comet seen for over a century was clearly visible in the night sky above Glastonbury Tor.

  • In this photo provided by Kevin Clifford, a meteor from the annual Perseid meteor shower falls from space over ruins at Fort Churchill State Historic Park on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, in Silver Springs, Nev. The Perseid meteors are debris left from the comet Swift-Tuttle. Fort Churchill was built in 1861 by the United States army to protect early settlers. (AP Photo/Kevin Clifford)

  • This March 2, 2013 photo made available by spaceweather.com shows the comet, Pan-STARRS, seen from Queenstown, New Zealand. The recently discovered comet is closer than it's ever been to Earth, and stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere finally get to see it. The comet passed within 100 million miles of Earth on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, its closest approach in its first-ever cruise through the inner solar system. The best viewing days should be next Tuesday and Wednesday, March 12 and 13, when Pan-STARRS appears next to a crescent moon at dusk in the western sky. Until then, glare from the sun will obscure the comet. (AP Photo/spaceweather.com, Minoru Yoneto)