Foreign Secretary William Hague today commended the people of Zimbabwe for holding peaceful presidential polls, but voiced "grave concerns" about the conduct of the election, which delivered Robert Mugabe a further term in power.

Mr Mugabe won the election with 61% of the vote, with challenger Morgan Tsvangirai trailing on 34%, said the Zimbabwean Electoral Commission.

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But Mr Tsvangirai alleged fraud and announced that his Movement for Democratic Change party would not participate in any government institutions in protest.

In a statement released by the Foreign Office in London, Mr Hague said: "People around the world are watching events in Zimbabwe, following the announcement by the Zimbabwean Electoral Commission that President Mugabe has won the presidential elections, as well as the indications of possible legal challenges.

"I commend the people of Zimbabwe on holding peaceful elections. However we have grave concerns over the conduct of the election.

"The preliminary statements of the African Union (AU) and Southern African Development Community (SADC) observation missions, and those of the domestic observer groups, have outlined many of these significant concerns, and I hope that their final assessments of the elections will take into account the full impact of these irregularities on the outcome."

Zimbabwe's Electoral Commission said that Mr Mugabe's Zanu-PF party won 158 of the 210 parliamentary seats, giving it a two-thirds majority in the legislature, which will enable it to make amendments to the new constitution.

Mr Tsvangirai has said he will challenge the result in the courts and called for the elections to be re-run.

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MDC's Morgan Tsvangirai described the poll as 'fraudulent'

And Mr Hague said that there were "serious" questions about the credibility of the election, because of irregularities both in the run-up to the ballot and on polling day itself.

Mr Hague said he was "deeply concerned" that a number of reforms promised in the 2008 Global Political Agreement setting out the terms of power-sharing between Zanu-PF and the MDC had still not been completed by the time of the presidential poll, despite being highlighted by SADC as "necessary for peaceful, credible, free and fair elections".

And he added: "We are also concerned with irregularities reported on the day.

"The AU preliminary report underlined in particular the strategic importance of the voters roll, and that by law it should have been made available to all political parties, yet observers saw no evidence that this was the case. This was a critical flaw.

"We also have concerns over reports of large numbers of voters who were turned away, particularly in urban areas, the very high numbers of extra ballot papers that were printed and additional polling stations apparently added on Election Day itself.

"The irregularities in the lead up to the elections and on election day itself, reported by the observer missions and in contravention of SADC's guidelines, call into serious question the credibility of the election. We note that some political parties have rejected the result on the basis of these irregularities.

"We will need to examine what has happened and consider further reports from regional and local observer missions. In the meantime, it is important that all allegations of electoral violations are thoroughly investigated. We will continue to support Zimbabwe and its people in their aspirations for a democratic, peaceful and prosperous future."

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  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Prime Minister of Zimbabwe Morgan Tsvangirai addresses a media conference in Harare on August 3, 2013 Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe's party claimed Friday it was headed for victory in crunch elections branded a 'sham' by his rivals as international observers prepared to hand down their verdict Friday. A leading opposition figure called for 'passive resistance' over the outcome of Wednesday's presidential and parliamentary elections, which the opposition and local monitors charge was riddled with flaws. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Prime Minister of Zimbabwe Morgan Tsvangirai addresses a media conference in Harare on August 3, 2013 Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe's party claimed Friday it was headed for victory in crunch elections branded a 'sham' by his rivals as international observers prepared to hand down their verdict Friday. A leading opposition figure called for 'passive resistance' over the outcome of Wednesday's presidential and parliamentary elections, which the opposition and local monitors charge was riddled with flaws. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabwe's President and Zanu PF Presidential candidate Robert Mugabe speaks at a press briefing on July 30, 2013 at the State House a day ahead of the general election in Zimbabwe. Veteran Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe vowed Tuesday to step down if he loses the fiercely-contested election, as his rivals charged they had concrete evidence of vote rigging. 'If you lose you must surrender,' the 89-year-old firebrand said at a rare press conference in Harare on the eve of Wednesday's presidential and parliamentary vote. AFP/PHOTO Jekesai Njikizana. AFP PHOTO JEKESAI NJIKIZANA (Photo credit should read JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabweans line up near a polling station in Harare to vote in a general election on July 31, 2013. Zimbabwe was readying for an inadequately prepared yet tight election battle that could see President Robert Mugabe extend his 33-year grip on power. From a list of five candidates, voters will chose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government forced by a crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run off. But the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai AFP/PHOTO JEKESAI NJIKIZANA (Photo credit should read JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabweans line up near a polling station in Harare to vote in a general election on July 31, 2013. Zimbabwe was readying for an inadequately prepared yet tight election battle that could see President Robert Mugabe extend his 33-year grip on power. From a list of five candidates, voters will chose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government forced by a crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run off. But the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai AFP/PHOTO JEKESAI NJIKIZANA (Photo credit should read JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    A policeman stands as Zimbabweans line up near a polling station in Harare to vote in a general election on July 31, 2013. Zimbabwe was readying for an inadequately prepared yet tight election battle that could see President Robert Mugabe extend his 33-year grip on power. From a list of five candidates, voters will chose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government forced by a crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run off. But the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai AFP/PHOTO JEKESAI NJIKIZANA (Photo credit should read JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    A Zimbabwean mother holding her child casts her ballot at a polling station on July 31, 2013 in Domboshava, 60km north of Harare. Zimbabwean vote today in a general election in Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe was readying for an inadequately prepared yet tight election battle that could see President Robert Mugabe extend his 33-year grip on power. From a list of five candidates, voters will chose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government forced by a crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run off. But the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. AFP/PHOTO ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    A Zimbabwean woman holding her child casts her ballot at a polling station in Domboshava, 60km north of Harare, on July 31, 2013, during the general election. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans flocked to vote today in a fiercely contested election marked by accusations of rigging by President Robert Mugabe's allies to extend his 33-year rule. From a list of five candidates, voters will choose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government was formed following a political crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run-off. However the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial opposition rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    A Zimbabwean holds up a ballot at a polling station in Domboshava, 60km north of Harare, on July 31, 2013, during the general election. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans flocked to vote today in a fiercely contested election marked by accusations of rigging by President Robert Mugabe's allies to extend his 33-year rule. From a list of five candidates, voters will choose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government was formed following a political crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run-off. However the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial opposition rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe (C) answers journalists questions after voting at a polling station at a school in Harare on July 31, 2013. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans were voting today in a fiercely contested election dominated by veteran President Robert Mugabe's bid to extend his 33-year rule and suspicions of vote rigging. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe (R) and his son Bellamine (L) leaves after voting at a polling station in a school in Harare on July 31, 2013. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans were voting today in a fiercely contested election dominated by veteran President Robert Mugabe's bid to extend his 33-year rule and suspicions of vote rigging. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • BRITAIN-ZIMBABWE-VOTE-PROTEST

    People sign a petition calling for a fair election as Protesters gather to demonstrate on behalf of 'democracy, rights and justice' for the people of Zimbabwe outside the Zimbabwean Embassy in central London, on July 31, 2013. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans flocked to cast their ballots today in a fiercely contested election overshadowed by accusations of vote-rigging as President Robert Mugabe bids to extend his 33-year rule. The 89-year-old firebrand, Africa's oldest leader, is running for office for the seventh and perhaps final time, after a series of violent crackdowns, economic crises and suspect elections. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)

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    Voters in Epworth township queue to vote at a polling station during presidential elections in Zimbabwe on July 31, 2013. Wrapped in blankets, Zimbabweans braved chilly weather on July 31, 2013 and came out in droves to vote in a fiercely contested presidential election. AFP/PHOTO Jekesai Njikizana. (Photo credit should read JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabwean people shop for vegetables in Jambanja market in Seke, 58km south of Harare, on August 2, 2013. Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe's party claimed on August 2 it was headed for victory in crunch elections branded a 'sham' by his rivals Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, as international observers prepared to hand down their verdict today. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • ZIMBABWE-POLITICS-VOTE

    Zimbabweans wait in line as they prepare to cast their ballots at a polling station in Domboshava, 60km north of Harare, on July 31, 2013, during the general election. Crisis-weary Zimbabweans flocked to vote today in a fiercely contested election marked by accusations of rigging by President Robert Mugabe's allies to extend his 33-year rule. From a list of five candidates, voters will choose who will lead the nation for the next five years after a compromise government was formed following a political crisis ignited by the 2008 presidential run-off. However the real battle is between Mugabe and his perennial opposition rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)