LIFESTYLE

What Are The New Revenge Porn Laws? Professionals Answer The Questions

13/04/2015 15:46 BST | Updated 13/04/2015 16:59 BST

New revenge porn laws have come into effect meaning those who share private, sexual images of someone without consent, and with the intent to cause distress, will face up to two years in prison.

While the move has been supported by campaigners, there are still a lot of unanswered questions surrounding the laws.

Namely, what does this mean for those who simply receive the files? And what protection do victims have if they are concerned about images online?

To clear things up, Jef McAllister, managing partner of McAllister Olivarius - a law firm representing victims of revenge pornography in the UK and United States - explains how the new legislation will work.

What Is The Law On Revenge Porn?

The revenge porn offence is introduced today as part of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act. Other new laws taking effect include:

:: Increasing the maximum penalty to two years in prison for online trolls who send abusive messages or material;

:: New criminal offences of juror misconduct, including for those who research details of a case;

:: Creating a new offence of causing serious injury by driving while disqualified, carrying a maximum penalty of four years in prison;

:: Making possession of extreme pornography that shows images depicting rape illegal.

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Revenge Porn Is Finally Illegal: Who Are The Victims And Perpetrators Of This Growing Phenomenon?

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