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14/09/2015 09:07 BST | Updated 14/09/2015 09:59 BST

David Cameron Visits Syrian Refugees In Lebanese Camp But Little Boy Totally Steals The Show

David Cameron has visited refugees in a Lebanese camp to better understand how British aid is being used to help those fleeing the Syrian civil war.

But the star of the visit was undoubtedly this little chap...

david cameron sad

The camp is one of 1,500 in the area

Cameron was invited to sit in the tent of a Syrian mother who told him she had just five dollars a month to keep her 10 children.

There are 500 people in the UNHCR-operated camp in the Bekaa Valley crammed into 90 tents but despite such hardships the spirit of the people there still shines through.

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The UK has refused to join an EU scheme to resettle 160,000 of the migrants around the continent

Cameron, who was making his first visit to Lebanon as PM, said: "I wanted to come here to see for myself and to hear for myself stories of refugees and what they need.

"Britain is already the second largest donor to refugee camps, to this whole crisis, really helping in a way that many other countries aren't with serious amounts of money.

"We will go on doing that including increasing the amount of money we are giving to educate Syrian children here in Lebanon and elsewhere. I think that's absolutely vital.

"I'm also appointing a specific minister for Syrian refugees to make sure that the 20,000 that we have promised to resettle and give a good warm home in our country, that that happens rapidly, it happens well, and the whole country pulls together to deliver that.

"I think it was vital to come here to see for myself what needs to be done."

He added: "I want to focus on how we help Syrian refugees here in Lebanon, in Jordan, how we make sure we discourage people from making this dangerous journey to Europe but instead we take people from these camps and we make them welcome in the United Kingdom, in our country.

"We make sure there are homes for them to go to, schools for their children, a warm welcome in Britain.

"Twenty thousand people we are taking... I want that to be done well, I want it to be something the whole country can be proud of and I wanted to come here today to hear their stories for myself."