TECH

Google's DeepMind Artificial Intelligence Beats Human At Go, World's Most Complex Board Game

28/01/2016 11:49 GMT | Updated 28/01/2016 11:59 GMT

Google's DeepMind artificial intelligence software has beaten a human at Go, widely regarded as the world's most complex board game.

artificial intelligence

Go has widely been regarded as the 'unsolved' challenge for artificial intelligence.

The AI accomplished the feat beating the European champion 5-0 by using a form of computer intelligence that mimics the neural networks we use in our own brains.

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DeepMind is able to analyse its own performance both in games against itself and in games against humans, look at its mistakes and then predict moves which it believes will rectify its shortcomings.

In essence, it can make itself better, much better. It needs to as well, Go is considered far more complex than chess with 10^761 possible outcomes.

go board game

If that sounds frankly terrifying then we've got some more great news for you, many experts in the field of AI reportedly believed that we wouldn't be able to accomplish this for nearly a decade.

Last year scientists were able to roughly maintain that most current AI has a human age of a four year old, however they did point out that this was going to dramatically increase in just a few years.

DeepMind's next big challenge will be taking on Lee Sedol, the world's greatest Go player for the last decade.

AI has long been defended and attacked by the scientific community for its potential to do good or evil. Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk has consistently warned against the dangers of AI even going so far as to suggest that to create AI would be to 'summon the demon'.

elon musk

That said the scientific community has warmed to the idea over the years thanks to a creation of a number of ethics boards which have been analysing how we use the technology.

In fact when Google first bought the UK-based DeepMind the small British startup only agreed to the deal on the condition that Google would use its influence to create an AI ethics board which would independently scrutinise both their own work but the work of other AI companies.