NEWS

Remain Supporters' Despair Over EU Referendum Results 'Nailed' By FT Reader

'When the facts met the myths they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens.'

24/06/2016 13:07 | Updated 24 June 2016

A Financial Times reader comment mourning the EU Referendum result has been hailed for succinctly summing up the sadness of Remain supporters.

The comment, written by journalist Nicholas Barrett on the FT's website, has been shared thousands of times online, after announcing Britain now lives in "a post factual democracy" following its decision to leave the EU.

It laments the "first three tragedies" of the Brexit win, including "lost opportunities, friendships, marriages and experiences" that it argues Brits will now be denied.

It was spotted and shared by a Twitter user with the handle @AD7863, who said the comment "puts it better than I ever could".

The post argues that "it was the working classes who voted for us to leave because they were economically disregarded and it is they who will suffer the most in the short term from the dearth of jobs and investment".

It claims the young generation will now lose the right to live and work in 27 countries, and that "perhaps most significantly, we now life in a post-factual democracy".

The pro-Remain post says: "When the facts met the myths they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens in an HG Wells novel".

The original tweet has been retweeted over 15,000 times, with users saying the comment "hits the ball squarely and firmly" and "nails it".

Read the full comment below:

“A quick note on the first three tragedies. Firstly, it was the working classes who voted for us to leave because they were economically disregarded, and it is they who will suffer the most in the short term. They have merely swapped one distant and unreachable elite for another. Secondly, the younger generation has lost the right to live and work in 27 other countries. We will never know the full extent of the lost opportunities, friendships, marriages and experiences we will be denied. Freedom of movement was taken away by our parents, uncles, and grandparents in a parting blow to a generation that was already drowning in the debts of our predecessors. Thirdly and perhaps most significantly, we now live in a post-factual democracy. When the facts met the myths they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens in a HG Wells novel. When Michael Gove said, ‘The British people are sick of experts,’ he was right. But can anybody tell me the last time a prevailing culture of anti-intellectualism has led to anything other than bigotry?” Nicholas

Suggest a correction
Comments

CONVERSATIONS