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These Are The Times

11/11/2016 12:48

Ever since Brexit, and probably during the build-up to it, I kept thinking, "this is what it's like to live in history". To live in a time when such monumental shifts are happening they will appear on a curriculum somewhere in the future, and people will be writing theses on 2016 in the way that they might write one now on 1066, 1918 or 1939.

Like most of the 48% of people who didn't vote for Britain to leave the EU, I've had to come to terms with the fact that I've been living in a bubble (London - the biggest bubble of all). Seventeen million people in the UK didn't think the same way as me or my friends. I'd already had an inkling that this might be the case during the election that brought our current Conservative government to power, but Brexit was still a mighty blow and wake-up call.

As we approach Remembrance Day, I think about how the World Wars defined my family. I know about my great uncles Joe and William who both died fighting in France. I think about how being born in 1918 and serving in the Second World War defined my father - even his memoir was called 'Between the Fires'. He told stories to me when I was a child of how shells whistled over his head in the North African desert, and I treasure the little book of photographs he brought back with him, showing him with his army friends.

My mother was a teenager during the Second World War and told me stories of the American GIs in town, taking a gas mask to school, and the sound of bombs hitting Liverpool, across the River Dee. She told me how she used to hide under the dinner table when the air raids were on. These were the stories my parents told when they were asked about themselves. I thought they were all rather romantic and slightly wished I'd experienced them too.

For my generation, and for others, I think our story starts now. I don't think we've experienced anything that has forced us to identify our place in the world until now. Yes, we've had the miners' strike, yes we had to deal with the threat of nuclear war in the Reagan-Thatcher era, yes we've had the Falklands and Gulf Wars. But nothing, in my view, has made us look at ourselves and the person standing next to us until now.

There is a tidal wave of right-wing aggression sweeping world politics right now. Political popularity is being built on a rising tide of xenophobia and misogyny and I think we're right to draw comparisons with the 1930s, and right to wonder how the hell this is happening again.

For a few years now, I've been bumbling along in a bubble of left-wing liberalism, finding my feminist voice and shouting about things I feel strongly about on social media. Even so, I've never really felt able to completely define what I stand for, beyond feminism, because I've bought into an amorphous cluster of already defined liberal ideas: I stand against racism, sexism and homophobia, and support human rights, freedom of speech and international co-operation, 'just like everyone else'.

Except not everyone else does.

These are the times when I have to recalibrate where I stand in the world. This is not just a case of retweeting a few statements I agree with, or sharing a meme on Facebook that makes me feel like I'm standing up for my values. What are my values? What is my story? How am I going to live it? What is the real-life action I'm going to take?

I keep looking for silver linings, in this ridiculous, Trumped-up world we find ourselves in. One is that so many of us are finding our political identity for the first time and the confidence to show it to the world. There is no doubt in my mind that Brexit and the Trump win are part of a backlash against the liberal values I stand for. As Guardian US columnist Jessica Valenti tweeted:

Tonight is what backlash looks like - to women's rights, to racial progress, to a cultural shift that doesn't center white men.

I had no idea that the groundswell of support behind the ideas put forward by Trump, Farage and Johnson was so great. That the Daily Mail extremism of a Katie Hopkins or a Milo Yiannopoulos would actually be a populist view taken seriously by millions of people.

But it is. They are.

It's naïve of us to think that we're not at the centre of a huge historical moment right now. All we need to do is join the dots. These are the times when I am going to wake up and define myself within it. I have to. There isn't a choice any more. There isn't a comfy armchair to sit in and watch the world go by.

I'm very very scared by the US election result. They have elected someone who bears all the hallmarks of a fascist dictator - one who might overturn a woman's right to abortion, who might build a wall to keep 'foreigners' out. So how wonderful is it that in a supreme case of role reversal, the German chancellor Angela Merkel is the one to fire a warning shot across US bows:

Germany and America are connected by common values: democracy, freedom, respect for the law and for human dignity irrespective of origin, skin colour, religion, gender, sexual orientation or political conviction. On the basis of these values, I offer the future president of America, Donald Trump, a close working relationship.

So here I am, Mum, Dad. Witnessing something colossal on the world stage, in the week where we remember events we thought could never be repeated. For the first time in my life I believe that they genuinely could. And for the first time in my life I feel compelled to define who I am, and witness my friends doing the same.

These are the times.

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