Conflict

No News From Malakal

Agus Morales | Posted 16.04.2014 | UK
Agus Morales

Life has disappeared from Malakal, a key town in oil-rich Upper Nile state, South Sudan. The clashes between government and opposition forces have turned Malakal, a square grid bordering the river Nile, into a ghost town. But some people didn't manage to escape - they were forced to witness the horror.

A Taxi Driver's Guide to Peace in the Philippines

Phil Vernon | Posted 31.03.2014 | UK
Phil Vernon

Taking full advantage of the opportunity for peace in the Philippines will require a sustained effort on the part of central and local governments, by the rebel movements, as well as in civil society and the business community, over many years. Some of the factors they will need to take into account were identified at by our taxi driver last night.

The World's Forgotten Crisis

Rob Williams | Posted 24.03.2014 | UK
Rob Williams

A new War Child report, released this week, marks exactly a year since a coup sent the Central African Republic (CAR), a country mired in protracted emergency, spiralling into even deeper crisis. We are also two weeks away from the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide - a tragedy which robust peacekeeping could have prevented. If you think this could never happen again, have a look at CAR, where children as young as three years old have been raped and left with horrific injuries. Other children have been killed, maimed and even beheaded.

The Operation Was Successful, But the Patient Died

Jonathan Whittall | Posted 20.03.2014 | UK
Jonathan Whittall

For those who do manage to reach health facilities, actual care often remains elusive because of cost. In Khost, in the east of the country, and in the capital, Kabul, roughly half the people surveyed by MSF borrowed money or sold what they could to pay for medicines or doctors' fees during a recent illness. Several sought care in neighbouring Pakistan.

Afghanistan: Rebuilding Girls' Education After Decades of Conflict

Manos Antoninis | Posted 20.03.2014 | UK
Manos Antoninis

For Nahida, education is not something to be viewed as a problem, but as part of the solution for breaking the cycle of conflict: "Educated people don't take guns," she said. "They don't destroy their country and their schools."

Syrian Refugees Make the Best of Temporary Schools

Manos Antoninis | Posted 18.03.2014 | UK
Manos Antoninis

Mohammed, a teacher from Syria who lives in Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, is participating in the Education for All Global Monitoring Report's #TeacherTuesday campaign. His daily struggle to help Syrian refugee children underlines the need to support teachers in difficult situations - and to make education a more central part of humanitarian efforts in conflict zones.

Mother's Day - How to Be an Ideal Mother in Law

Cat Williams | Posted 19.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Cat Williams

An 'interfering mother-in-law' is one of society's favourite stereotypes. The term 'mother-in-law' sounds negative and criticising even before anything is known about the individual themselves. Mothers and daughters-in-law often find it particularly difficult to get along. What is the secret of those who can overcome the stereotype, and build a friendship with their 'DIL'?

How Cross-Border Trade Is Empowering Women and Fostering Peace in DRC

Maria Lange | Posted 11.03.2014 | UK Politics
Maria Lange

Through a collection of photographs and interviews, Crossings: The journey to peace challenges predominant narratives about eastern DRC, which focus on 'conflict trade' and 'rape' above broader lived experiences.

South Sudan: Give Peace (and Children) a Chance!

Unni Krishnan | Posted 07.03.2014 | UK
Unni Krishnan

In a group of 100 children, singing, playing and some crying, two girls stand out. Their names are Madiha, 9, and Lina, 4. It is not their unusual silence that catches my attention, but the way they frequently hug each other, often involuntarily...

LGBT Rights and Peace: Why Aren't We Talking About It?

Phil Vernon | Posted 07.03.2014 | UK Politics
Phil Vernon

While it is clearly important for peacebuilders to pay more attention to the marginalisation and repression of LGBT people, it's not always so obvious how we should do so...

Thousands Benefit in Areha and Muhambel, Syria, as UN Supply Convoy Reaches Families in Areas Ravaged by Intense Fighting

Michele Al Kaae | Posted 11.04.2014 | UK
Michele Al Kaae

Last week, I was part of a UN inter-agency convoy that brought much-needed emergency supplies to the Areha district, including for nearby Muhambel town. It has been months since humanitarian assistance has been able to get through. Even now that the fighting has stopped in this area, the 22-truck convoy had to take a circuitous route to avoid active hot areas.

Britain Neglecting Citizen in Unfair Congo Murder Trial, Lawyer Says

Simon J Clark | Posted 29.03.2014 | UK
Simon J Clark

The UK government is neglecting a British former soldier who is losing an unfair murder trial in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the suicide of his cellmate and friend, his lawyer said.

Protecting Women & Girls in Crisis

Sir Peter Westmacott | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Sir Peter Westmacott

Worldwide, one in five women will become a victim of rape or attempted rape in their lifetime. Women and girls are even more at risk in crisis situations, particularly flood, famine, and conflict.

What Happens When Women and Girls Seek Help in Emergencies? The Awful Truth About Violence

Geeta Bandi-Phillips | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Geeta Bandi-Phillips

When people seek help in emergencies, we like to think that they will receive that help. But the awful truth is that for too many women and girls, what they are met with is violence - and then silence. Finally the world is starting to talk about it. And there is the hope.

One Chapter of War in DRC May Be Over, But What Now for Peace?

Maria Lange | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Politics
Maria Lange

In the longer term, peace in DRC also requires its government to undertake effectively and in good faith its commitments under this framework, including key structural governance and security sector reforms, and create the conditions for the national oversight mechanism to function effectively...

'Poppygate' and Students' Unions

Aisling Gallagher | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Aisling Gallagher

Like it or not, poppies no longer represent what they initially were created for. Every year we have remembrance services where those in power in the state talk about our military and giving thanks to their courage, whilst handily forgetting that when current soldiers often come back from tours of Afghanistan, it's up to charities to mend what's been broken.

A City Surrounded by Conflict Struggles to Cope Under Weight of Displacement

Mougabe Koslengar | Posted 24.10.2013 | UK
Mougabe Koslengar

In contrast to the rural areas, the parts of the city I saw looked normal, with no damage to buildings. People moved around and there was a bustling market like in any city. The city's infrastructure is creaking, however, due to the huge influx of displaced families.

Does 'Pure Evil' Exist? Psychologists Investigate the Devils (and Angels) Amongst Us

Dr Raj Persaud | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Dr Raj Persaud

If you believe in 'Pure Evil' you are more likely to react aggressively to wrong-doing, while if you deem 'Pure Good' exists, you're more optimistic about human nature, and believe that the bad can change, supporting programmes that see the better side of people.

Iraq: Politics and Science in Post-Conflict Health Research

Neel Mani | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Neel Mani

During my time as the director of the World Health Organisation's (WHO) programme in Iraq between 2001 and 2003, the WHO, together with other agencies...

Change Takes Time - It Is Not an Event, it Is a Process

One Young World | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
One Young World

The issues raised during Kofi Annan Dialogues Special Session ranged from the security in Nigeria and El Salvador and the on-going crises in Syria and Lybia to answers on how to close the gap between young citizens and global leaders...

Why Do People Donate to Natural Disasters and Not to Wars?

Resham Khiani | Posted 06.11.2013 | UK
Resham Khiani

You're watching TV and a fundraising appeal for Syria comes on. There are shocking images and no one can deny the serious needs of the men, women and children on the screen. But you don't reach for your debit card at the end. Something in you has not been moved quite as much as when you saw such an appeal for the tsunami victims in 2004.

A Border That Breaks: Jordan as the Alternative Homeland

Nikita Malik | Posted 05.11.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Nikita Malik

Earlier this week, the United Nations declared Syria's refugee crisis the 'humanitarian calamity' of the century. Every day, roughly 5,000 refugees flee Syria with little more than the clothes on their backs. The number of Syrians who have left their war-ravaged country has risen to more than two million. A year ago, that number was 230,671.

Climate Changes Fuel Civil Strife And Global Conflict

PA | Posted 01.08.2013 | UK

Climate change has fanned the flames of global conflict throughout human history, according to new research. The study shows a similar pattern all ...

Deal or No Deal: Why Cyprus Remains Divided

Charles Trew | Posted 25.09.2013 | UK Politics
Charles Trew

For more than 50 years, the island has been unsettled: with periods of violence in the past, there is a now a kind of 'frozen conflict'. The two main communities on the island live apart and a wall separates Greek Cypriots in the south from Turkish Cypriots in the north. Nicosia remains the only divided capital in the world since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Natural Riches, the Risk of Conflict - And What to do About It

Dan Smith OBE | Posted 26.08.2013 | UK
Dan Smith OBE

For a developing country facing high poverty levels, a growing population with high expectations despite a poor revenue base and weak institutions, bu...