Humanitarian Aid

How Do You Support Half A Million People In A 'City' That's Arrived Overnight?

Alexander Matheou | Posted 05.10.2017 | UK
Alexander Matheou

Imagine the population of a city, about the size of Liverpool or Bristol, being relocated into a damp, rainy countryside without drinking water, shelter, food or latrines. Imagine the logistical challenge of building all the necessities of a safe life before hunger takes a deadly toll, before diseases break out and before the strong prey on the weak. That is what has happened over the last six weeks in Bangladesh. Over half a million people have walked for days from their homes in Myanmar, crossed rivers and marshes, over the border into Cox's Bazar, and then settled on barren hills, in forests and on rice fields.

Rwanda: A Tiny Country With Limited Resources Where There Is A Spirit Of Generosity And Tolerance. A Country The UK Could Learn Well From

Ruth Wilson | Posted 27.09.2017 | UK
Ruth Wilson

'Shoot!' yells Karina, a tall, athletic 15-year-old Burundian as she launches a ball in my direction. I grab it, go for the basket and miss. To be fai...

Incredible Stories Of Refugees Fleeing Intense Violence In Myanmar

Imran Madden | Posted 26.09.2017 | UK
Imran Madden

You can see that the refugees are self-sufficient and stoic, and that they are determined to help themselves. While this independent spirit is essential in the chaos of the first few days, it will be down to NGOs like Islamic Relief, for the most part, to provide them with improved shelter units, water, sanitation and food.

Lessons From The Myanmar Response: Why We Need To Support Local And National Aid Agencies

Imran Madden | Posted 17.09.2017 | UK
Imran Madden

Images of thousands of refugees fleeing Myanmar have quite rightly focused global attention on the human tragedy of displacement and the search for safety. However, there is another story here, namely the scramble to deliver aid to over 400,000 refugees - the population of a small city.

Myanmar Refugees: There Is No Greater Toll Than The Loss Of Life

Imran Madden | Posted 15.09.2017 | UK
Imran Madden

At the point where so many seek a new life, for too many it marks the end of theirs - surely a toll too high to pay.

Things Fall Apart, The Centre Must Hold

Michel Maietta | Posted 13.09.2017 | UK
Michel Maietta

Last month the Inter Agency Regional Analyst Network (IARAN), a consortium of NGOs, private and academic partners, published a report about what kinds of crises we can expect until 2030 and how the sector needs to adapt to best respond to the needs of people most affected. What does the world look like in 2030? According to the IARAN there are 9 types of crises we can expect to see...

Why Is No One Talking About One Of The World's Largest Humanitarian Emergencies?

Alexander Matheou | Posted 06.09.2017 | UK
Alexander Matheou

As the International Development Secretary Priti Patel visited Maiduguri last week, the Lake Chad crisis comes into public consciousness for a brief time. But we must all work to ensure that the momentum of public awareness and support is maintained, to make sure that voices of people like Abba and Hadiza are heard in this silent emergency.

Hunger In South Sudan: Don't Let The Rainy Season Become The Dying Season

John Loreom | Posted 11.08.2017 | UK
John Loreom

I tell these mothers to just keep going. Dig for hours to find water underground. Walk for days to find nuts in the bush. Skip meal after meal to keep your children alive. Help is coming. And until then you just have to survive. That's what I tell myself every day when I miss my family painfully and get up, get ready for work, and just keep going.

How Mobile Phones Can Reduce Hunger

Laurie Lee | Posted 04.08.2017 | UK
Laurie Lee

Severe drought - like the one faced by Zimbabwe in 2015 - can cause hunger and misery for thousands of people. The response effort has to be quick, f...

Rescue At Sea: A Mother Pays The Ultimate Price For Bringing Her Baby To Safety Across The Mediterranean

Lizzie Copestake | Posted 07.07.2017 | UK
Lizzie Copestake

We discovered that the fuel was leaking into the flimsy boat, which had taken on water because it could not withstand the weight of the 120-plus people crammed into it. By the time we arrived, the toxic mixture had spread everywhere, causing the most horrific chemical burns. In many cases, people's skin had come off and they had raw red wounds. Among these casualties were two men and two women - including the baby's mother - who had already perished.

Changing The Lives Of Disabled People In South Sudan: The Real Impact Of The Humanitarian Disability Charter

Aleema Shivji | Posted 30.06.2017 | UK
Aleema Shivji

Nine years since I was last here, I'm back in South Sudan, the world's newest nation. Part of the work I am doing here, with our team, is to implement...

What The World Needs From A Global Britain

Kirsty Young | Posted 30.06.2017 | UK
Kirsty Young

The UK Government intends to review the rules through which UK aid is spent. After all, these systems shouldn't be static or inflexible and they must of course respond to and reflect the world in which they operate. But in doing so, we mustn't lose the clarity of purpose that our aid has, or allow it to become tied to short term military or trade missions that would lessen its impact. Instead, let it continue to focus on the lives it saves and the poverty it eradicates.

Mosul: A Graveyard For Iraq's Children?

George Graham | Posted 28.06.2017 | UK
George Graham

A bombed out school in West Mosul Three years after Mosul first fell to the so-called Islamic State in Iraq & Syria (ISIS), the battle to retake Iraq...

'Nothing Could Have Prepared Me For This Moment': The Emotional Scars of War

Larissa Schneider | Posted 02.06.2017 | UK
Larissa Schneider

While the magnitude of suffering in Mosul is almost impossible to fully comprehend, I have witnessed incredible transformations that show the strength of the human spirit. In Mosul, people are engaged and committed to supporting their communities - helping us create a network that will have a lasting legacy for families in need.

The World Humanitarian Summit One Year Later: Participation Revolution? People Need Agency And Information

Aimee Ansari | Posted 31.05.2017 | UK Tech
Aimee Ansari

Picture this: People are on the move; they haven't eaten for days, and some are dying. They need burial cloths. Burial cloths are more important to them than food, as it helps ensure a peaceful afterlife. In a poor village, the next life means hope if the dead are prepared. Hope is all they have.

Hawa's Story: Empowering Women In North Cameroon

Larissa Schneider | Posted 09.05.2017 | UK
Larissa Schneider

"I have finally found a normal and desirable life. I am now able to save a bit of money so that I can provide a better life for my children." Yet it...

Why Critics Of South Sudan Humanitarian Aid Have Got It Wrong

Anne-Birgitte Albrectsen | Posted 25.04.2017 | UK
Anne-Birgitte Albrectsen

The caustic nature of the dialogue and sheer volume of comments was shocking. Some people said they didn't see the point of supporting the appeal because they'd been donating for years and it hadn't made one iota of difference. They're wrong.

What Easter Has To Say To A Broken, Hurting World

Johan Eldebo | Posted 14.04.2017 | UK
Johan Eldebo

As we approach Easter, it's easy to look around and find a rather bleak, even devastating, picture of the world. There's famine in East Africa, with 16 million people on the brink of starvation and 22 million in need of humanitarian assistance to survive. The British public have been incredibly generous in their response but without even more funding, people are at risk of dying from hunger.

As Damascus Becomes A Battleground Again - Is There Hope For The Future Of Syria?

Dr Mairead Collins | Posted 23.03.2017 | UK
Dr Mairead Collins

After periods of heavy fighting, the district of Al Qaboun had in recent years lived in relative peace under a truce between rebels and government for...

Famines Are Man-Made. We Have The Power To Prevent Them.

Mark Goldring | Posted 22.03.2017 | UK
Mark Goldring

Last week, Oxfam chartered a small plane and distributed beans, rice and oil in Panyijar in South Sudan. This was very much a last resort - not least because of the expense - but it was the only way to reach these communities and keep them alive.

Volunteering Abroad Renews Your Sense Of Pride And Faith In The NHS

Manish Raval | Posted 21.03.2017 | UK
Manish Raval

I'm an anaesthetist and volunteer for blindness prevention charity Orbis. We operate the Flying Eye Hospital, which is a teaching facility with both a...

Somalia Is On The Brink Of Another Catastrophic Famine, But Where Is The Urgent Response?

Awo Tarabi | Posted 19.03.2017 | UK
Awo Tarabi

Somalis all over are looking for ways to send aid back home, turning to traditional tribal networks to seek out those most in need. With images of starving children with sunken cheeks and hollow eyes circulating the Somali diaspora community, the pressure to act now is critical. We cannot stand by and wait for another 260,000 lives to be lost and only then realise, we could have done something. But by then, once again, it would be too little, too late. The time to act is now.

Top 5 Humanitarian Women

Frontier | Posted 14.03.2017 | UK
Frontier

Feminism and humanitarianism are intrinsically linked, both working towards the welfare and fair treatment of all. Here are five women whose humanitarian work has paved the way toward an equal global society.

This Is A Worsening Humanitarian Crisis That Shows No Signs Of Slowing

Mike Adamson | Posted 27.02.2017 | UK
Mike Adamson

Severe hunger that threatens lives is spreading across parts of Africa. Chronically and silently, a food crisis has been growing which the UN says now means that 20million people are facing deadly hunger. It hasn't happened in a day, it won't be solved in one, but it desperately needs the world's focus to save those lives.

From Poverty To Profits: A Widow's Story Of Opportunities Seized And Futures Secured

Larissa Schneider | Posted 10.02.2017 | UK
Larissa Schneider

The lowest point came when her children dropped out of school, their time dominated with the need to forage for wild cabbage to keep the family from s...