Humanitarian Aid

The Other Side Of The Mosul Operation: How Do You Help One Million People Who Need Food, Water And Shelter?

Mike Adamson | Posted 21.10.2016 | UK
Mike Adamson

Over recent weeks and months we've seen attacks on civilian targets such as hospitals and aid convoys in Syria and Yemen. We appeal to all parties to respect the basic principles of international humanitarian law - precaution, protection and distinction of civilians. Everything must be done to allow the safe and unimpeded access to any humanitarian organisation working to protect and assist the people fleeing Mosul.

Haiti: Five Things To Remember When Battling A Monster Storm And Its Fallout

Unni Krishnan | Posted 11.10.2016 | UK
Unni Krishnan

We can't stop storms or earthquakes. But we can stop disasters turning into crises. In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, here is a list of five key things to remember during the relief and recovery effort in Haiti.

Poverty Fixation Will Not Solve Global Turmoil - Increasing Opportunity Is Key

Simon O'Connell | Posted 30.09.2016 | UK
Simon O'Connell

With this knowledge, and with courage and honesty, we must build on the rhetoric of the New York meeting to identify practical solutions. In today's globalised world, where instability in one place can affect stability in another, we must find ways for all individuals to access opportunity, so they can contribute and achieve irrespective of where they were born.

This Is Not The First Attack On Aid Workers In Syria - But It Must Be The Last

Mike Adamson | Posted 25.09.2016 | UK
Mike Adamson

Volunteers are not collateral damage. They are not acceptable targets when a ceasefire ends. Ceasefire or no, the rules of international humanitarian law still apply. Safe access must mean safe access. Guarantees given by fighting parties must be honoured. This recent attack has horrified people across the world. It has also denied 78,000 people of much-needed aid. These attacks cannot and must not continue. We call for all aid workers to be respected and protected. This, sadly, may not be the first time aid workers have been attacked. But it should be - it must be - the last.

Freelancing In Aleppo, Pro Bono

Natasha Freidus | Posted 14.09.2016 | UK
Natasha Freidus

Last week when a U.S presidential candidate asked "What is Aleppo?" in response to a question about his policy plans for Syria, I was just as disguste...

The Senseless Death Of Children Is Not Something We Can Ignore

Alex Panayides | Posted 05.09.2016 | UK
Alex Panayides

Just over a year ago you will have seen a photograph of the lifeless body of Alan Kurdi on an Aegean beach. It was said that the photograph "shook the world", but more than 3,000 more people have died, or are missing, in the Mediterranean this year alone. We, and our politicians, might disagree about many things but we should all agree that the senseless death of children - on any scale - is not something that we can ignore.

Faster, Higher, Stronger: Celebrating The Humanitarian Spirit At The Rio Olympics And Onwards

Unni Krishnan | Posted 25.08.2016 | UK
Unni Krishnan

In wars and disaster zones, a simple explanation is that humanity is a force that advances the idea of life, with dignity. To strengthen the idea of humanity for people caught in conflicts, epidemics and disasters, we could borrow some ideas from the Olympic motto: Citius (faster), Altius (higher) and Fortius (stronger).

On Why I'm A Human(rights)itarian

Natasha Freidus | Posted 22.08.2016 | UK Politics
Natasha Freidus

I became immersed in this world of humanitarian work, and quickly realized that it's hard to talk about long-term change when kids in front of you have nothing to eat. But here's the thing. What does it mean to talk about humanitarian aid in a crisis, when there's no end in sight?

South Sudan Crisis: A Failure Of A Half-Hearted International Community?

Alistair Burnett | Posted 15.08.2016 | UK
Alistair Burnett

Responsibility for the unfolding disaster in South Sudan can also be laid at the door of the international community. The United States, for instance, was instrumental in pushing for its independence, but was not prepared for the long term commitment required to build a functioning state.

From 'Difficult Friend' to BFF: UK's Role in Global Tax System Must Be Part of Post-Brexit Reinvention

Barry Johnston | Posted 04.08.2016 | UK
Barry Johnston

In the wake of the EU referendum the UK is revising its relationship with the world. We could use a few friends. Taking on a new role as the torchbearer for global tax reform could win us more than a few.

When the Skill of Questioning Is Listening: Interviewing Refugees in Europe

Katy Williams | Posted 19.07.2016 | UK
Katy Williams

Having recently undertaken the perilous journey from Damascus to Berlin, researcher and filmmaker Reem Karssli - now seeking asylum in Germany - had a strong connection with the people she interviewed for BBC Media Action's research into the communication needs of refugees in Europe.

Sight-Saving Surgery In the Amazon

Clare O'Neill | Posted 06.07.2016 | UK
Clare O'Neill

I've just returned from two weeks working with the Andean Medical Mission in San Borja in El Beni, Bolivia. AMM send medical teams to Bolivia every ye...

Sands of Time: The World's Largest Refugee Camp Turns 25

Luke Browne | Posted 30.06.2016 | UK
Luke Browne

Most conflicts now burn on for an average of 37 years, and those uprooted by them are crying out for a humanitarian response that reflects this. If a new deal for Kenya is realised over the coming months, Dadaab may no longer remain an anachronism. It could, with the right imagination, political drive and institutional support, come to represent the future.

World Refugee Day: A Collision of World Crises, Tax Havens and THAT Referendum

Johan Eldebo | Posted 21.06.2016 | UK Politics
Johan Eldebo

This year I've travelled to some pretty difficult places. My work has taken me to war-torn Central African Republic (CAR) and to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in Africa. I have also travelled to the border of Serbia and Macedonia where I met refugees fleeing the fighting in Syria, Iraq and Somalia. In particular, I remember meeting children far too familiar with the sound of gunfire.

I Never Met Jo Cox, But I Wish I Had. May She Rest in Peace, And May We Carry Her Banner of Love

Benedict Rogers | Posted 21.06.2016 | UK Politics
Benedict Rogers

Jo Cox spent almost all her adult life devoted to the same two causes to which I have devoted mine: humanitarian aid and human rights, and politics. And she was the same age as me. Indeed, we were only eight days apart.

Aid: Honestly, There's a Lot More to It Than Stats

Ben Jackson | Posted 14.06.2016 | UK
Ben Jackson

If you've been reading certain doom-filled parts of the media over the last couple of weeks, you may think that the debate about aid centres on number...

Aid Reform not Reduction Needed Post-World Humanitarian Summit

Simon O'Connell | Posted 10.06.2016 | UK
Simon O'Connell

Ending the UK's commitment to spend just 7p out of every £10 of our national wealth on international aid is not the answer. This will send the wrong signal to both the countries we are asking to commit to the same spending, and importantly to the hundreds of millions of the world's poorest who we are supporting to lift out of poverty once and for all.

Muhammad Ali Had the Name He Deserved

Lauren Booth | Posted 10.06.2016 | UK Sport
Lauren Booth

Muhammad Ali, the man loved by people of all faiths, nations and walks of life, is laid to rest. The Islamic funeral service in his hometown, Louisvil...

Learning to Smile Again: Saving Lives and Relieving Suffering in Al-Dora, Iraq

Larissa Schneider | Posted 02.06.2016 | UK
Larissa Schneider

Nine-year-old Haneen has not eaten for days and often cries herself to sleep. Born with physical disabilities, Haneen is unable to hear, speak or walk since birth - issues that would be challenging in any environment, let alone in a camp outside of Baghdad for people who have fled their homes.

World Humanitarian Summit: Progress Towards Better Aid for Those in Need

Johan Eldebo | Posted 27.05.2016 | UK Politics
Johan Eldebo

A few weeks ago I was in the Central African Republic, one of the most complex humanitarian crises I have experienced. 420,000 people are internally displaced and over 2.3 million people are in dire need of humanitarian assistance. This is about half of the population of the CAR.On top of going through numerous coup d'états since its independence, this war-torn country also has some of the lowest human development indicators in the world.

It Is Right to Question Foreign Aid, But We Must Remember the Vital Causes It Serves

Phil Vernon | Posted 26.05.2016 | UK
Phil Vernon

On 13th June, the UK Parliament will debate the proposition that the government's approach to foreign aid is flawed. This is based on a petition initi...

Meet the People on the Frontline

Mike Adamson | Posted 25.05.2016 | UK
Mike Adamson

The first-ever World Humanitarian Summit was held this week. It brought together charities, international organisations and world leaders from 175 cou...

World Humanitarian Summit: A Humanitarian Contribution to Peace Is the Missing Piece of the Puzzle

Harriet Lamb | Posted 23.05.2016 | UK
Harriet Lamb

What do you have as your screensaver? While some companies allow staff to revel in their favourite sunset snap or their kids pulling hideous faces, others provide the screensavers to focus minds on the top priorities.

Anti-Corruption Summit Should Go Beyond Lip Service and Provide Room for Civil Society to Function in the Most Affected Countries

Donald Mogeni | Posted 12.05.2016 | UK
Donald Mogeni

David Cameron will today be smarting from the faux pas of making an acutely embarrassing indiscretion under the glance of cameras. Just days before the 2016 anti-corruption summit, the UK Prime Minister will be hosting, he was caught on camera in discussion with the Queen and the Archbishop of Canterbury, describing two of the countries sending delegates to London as "fantastically corrupt countries".

Worlds Apart: A Girl's Eye View of Hunger

Himaya Quasem | Posted 06.05.2016 | UK
Himaya Quasem

Nimah's family has lost 25 of their 35 sheep to the drought. If the remaining sheep are lost it could tip the family into destitution. Without livestock they will have nothing to eat or trade with. This prospect makes Nimah fear for her younger siblings.