NEWS
29/01/2018 15:12 GMT | Updated 29/01/2018 15:16 GMT

Banksy Mural: Hull Window Cleaner Jason Fanthorpe Praised For Saving 'Work Of International Significance

'I couldn't just sit back and see nothing happen.'

A window cleaner is the toast of Hull after “saving” a mural by Banksy which was painted over, much to the chagrin of locals.

The stencilled artwork - depicting a child carrying a wooden sword with a pencil attached, under the text ‘Draw the raised bridge’ - was whitewashed on Sunday night leading to outraged residents demanding Hull City Council clarify why this “work of international significance wasn’t protected”.

After noticing the graffiti mural on Scott Street, Wincolmlee, had been defaced, window cleaner Jason Fanthorpe rushed to the rescue, using water and white spirit to partly restore the image. 

Fanthorpe was photographed early on Monday morning, working to fix the artwork which had drawn crowds to the industrial area.

RAISE THE DRAWBRIDGE! Hull.

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on

Speaking to BBC Radio Humberside, Fanthorpe explained how he was “just going to bed” when he learnt the Banksy had been “destroyed”.

“It wasn’t just me that helped, this work is international prestige gifted to the city, and I couldn’t sit back and see nothing happen.

“Being a window cleaner I had the equipment and the ladder, and I tried with just water at first. I was desperate not to destroy it but I had to use white spirit to get it off.”

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Hull residents have demanded answers from the council

 Writing on Banksy’s Instagram account on Sunday, one fan of his work said: “Can’t believe wot (sic) they did to your work. Ffs such an embarrassment. Thank you so much for making me and my daughters day today Banksy. It was great to be part of it white it lasted. Iv just woke them with the news and they said he will be back to fix it. I hope there right, but personally HCC (Hull City Council) don’t give a fucking shite.”

Hull City Council has since installed a large protective cover over the artwork.

“This temporary measure will help to ensure that the public can continue to enjoy the work,” a spokesperson said.