The Blog

Miracles And Me, Life On The Up

There are so many different medical conditions and disabilities today, the chances are we don't know about them until they affect us or someone close to us personally. I would like to share a little about my son Cooper. I say a little, but he really has so much to offer!

There are so many different medical conditions and disabilities today, the chances are we don't know about them until they affect us or someone close to us personally. I would like to share a little about my son Cooper. I say a little, but he really has so much to offer!

Cooper was born in April 2013 along with his twin brother Lucas. Cooper was twin one and weighed a little 4lbs 14oz and Lucas was born two minutes later weighing a big 7lbs 9oz and a bit...

One of the midwifes became concerned about Cooper five hours after birth, he was unusually sleepy and not feeding. After a pin prick blood test showed he had low blood sugar, he was taken to neonatal for the night.

One night turned into five weeks of hell....

Cooper began to have seizures and had dangerously low oxygen levels on the first night. He was then moved to intensive care and put on machines and a tube was put into his nose to enable feeding.

At six days old he was transferred to Yorkhill Children's Hospital for a MRI scan to see what was going on. After the scan, a neurologist (I will never forget his face) told us that Cooper had suffered grade four bleeding on the brain and would be severely disabled, if he survived.

I remember feeling so angry at this doctor, thinking why is he saying this?? So many questions that NO ONE could answer, it was horrific! I could tell they didn't think Cooper had long to live but no one actually said it.

After transferring back to our local hospital, where the boys were born, Cooper began to fight back. His oxygen levels steadied and he stopped having seizures. However, the paediatric consultant had told us, his parents, they suspect Cooper has hydrocephalus! What?? We had never heard of this! More questions which couldn't be answered....he told us about a shunt and that Cooper might possibly need one at some point. We had never heard of a shunt but we decided to take each day and see if we encounter this in the future.

At five weeks old, Cooper left hospital! He was finally well enough to come home. Still being tube fed every three hours, but he finally got to feel the wind on his face, I had wanted this for so long. This was a milestone in itself.

So, this is the start of Cooper's life and four years on he is doing amazing. He did have to get a shunt fitted in his brain, but that's ok because it saved his life. Then diagnosed with cerebral palsy as he cannot sit unaided or walk...yet, but it doesn't matter, he is here!!

He has coped brilliantly with everything and he never complains. Constant physiotherapy in the forms of movement groups, hydrotherapy, hippo therapy, rebound therapy, intensive physio courses and extra at the weekends, he just gets on with it.

Cooper is such a sociable little boy, he loves his brothers and he will love making friends as he gets older.

In so many ways, Cooper has defied the odds to be here. When medically, he wasn't expected to survive, he did! He not only survived. ..he has gone on to lead a happy and achieving life. He definitely will have many more years ahead.

Cooper's journey can be found at https//:www.facebook.com/miraclesandme/