Anorexia nervosa

The term 'Drunkorexia' is relatively new, but the condition is not. Drunkorexia is a combination of alcoholism and anorexia or bulimia. Usually, a person suffering from drunkorexia will deprive himself or herself of food during the day, in an attempt to keep calories under control when he or she goes drinking later.
Recovery is such a tricky thing for someone who has an eating disorder. You never think you will reach a day when you don't feel fat and will not count calories. There are no fancy drugs to take to cure it, no definite answer about the cure, and no way of telling how you are going to feel from one day to the next.
I knew all the tricks of the trade. And over time I got better at lying, hiding food, causing a scene at a meal time... I was pleased with myself. I felt proud as I began to lose weight. Proud when I missed meals and no one knew. My anorexia praised me. She told me how well I was doing.
Comparing myself to others is one of the hardest things I have had to deal with throughout my recovery. I walk into a room, I stand on the tube, I walk down the road and I compare the physique and appearance of every female around me.
My life seems so different now, I sit here waiting for my boyfriend to cook dinner, I have a pudding planned and celebrations over the weekend. Six years ago I would have done none of this. Six years ago my life was planned around food and exercise.
For the past five years I've been campaigning and raising awareness of men with eating disorders with an aim to debunk the myth that eating disorders is a 'female problem.' Significant advances in awareness have been made in this short space of time to highlight the inequalities male sufferers face, but there's still a long way to go
Jeremy Gillitzer was an american guy that I discovered in 2008 when I was researching online with an idea to set up 'something' for men with eating disorders. Having read Jeremy's blog I felt an immediate sense of relief knowing that my experience was not alien after-all.
It's easy to point the finger at GPs for not picking up on the signs but are they really to blame? Currently, doctors have no training on eating disorders as part of their seven-year degree. They have approximately 10 minutes - if that - with each patient and hardly sufficient to investigate a patient presenting the symptoms.
Students are known for their bad eating habits; baked beans have become a beacon for the university experience. It's not surprising really - we don't have nine to five schedules, or lunch breaks, or regular wages... We only have ourselves to decide that cereal for the third time in a day is a bad decision, instead of a detox. Which makes it dangerously easy for people to fall through the gaps. In the student culture of make do and make pasta, again, eating disorders can be hard to spot.
Cosmopolitan magazine, the media partner for eating disorder charity Beat, has launched a campaign ahead of Eating Disorders