Britpop

As a tween, before the term was coined, I looked at 40 year olds and they seemed old. They were proper grown-ups. They celebrated wedding anniversaries in double figures. They complained about mortgage rates, also in double figures.
On Friday 10th February, it will be exactly twenty years since Blur released their eponymous fifth album - a record that
It's been two decades since Oasis battled Blur in the charts.
A subgenre of pop rock and alternative rock, Britpop was a cultural movement in the 1990s that represented a cocky, patriotic
As a young woman in a band I was patronised by sound men, literally kicked by roadies who saw us sitting down in a corridor and assumed we were groupies when we were locked out of our dressing room at Brixton Academy. I was laughed at for being ugly in the music press. The NME said they would put our band, Kenickie, (three 18-year-old women and one guy) on the cover if we got naked and painted ourselves gold.
Traditionally, American rock bands that couldn't make it big in the United States used to move to England. The idea was that
Here at HuffPost UK Entertainment, we're lucky to have a huge selection of entertainment commentators and personalities blogging
Fast-forward two decades and beneath any commemorative fanfare have been many writers and BTL-commenters denouncing the whole Britpop movement as derivative and worthless, as merely 'recycled' 60s music.
"People still try and emulate John Peel," says David Gedge, leader of The Wedding Present and one of the last true survivors of the British music scene of the 1980s. "His work as a musicologist put everything into context."
Best song? Couldn't say, that would be cheating. Although I will admit, Pink Glove has a certain bite and drive that is irresistible, and who could resist that incendiary, bitchy, gleefully observant chorus?*