children's literature

Bringing up a feminist son is as important as raising a feminist daughter, so I looked for books that challenge gender stereotypes, especially those featuring sensitive boys.
If your child could do anything this summer, what would it be? Walk with dinosaurs, embark on a treasure hunt with pirates, propel themselves in to outer space, or maybe play for their favourite football team in a cup final? Anything is possible - when you find the right book!
The connection that children had with the characters in books extended well beyond just dressing up. Children have such strong emotional connections to literature, and we know that through story they learn a great deal about their own emotional world.
I believe characters in stories should be as diverse as the people who read them, but only a very small handful of children's books feature a deaf character. There are more than 45,000 deaf children in the UK. Most are born to hearing parents and go to mainstream schools where they may be the only deaf child, so they can feel quite isolated.
So, in a project I went in search of picture books that represented disability. The project was driven by my personal belief that picture books could be an effective and successful way of opening up a conversation about disability, which can subsequently enable a child to understand and accept disability in real life.
This isn't the place to recount all the terrifying new policies, or comment on the potential disastrous consequences. Instead, I want to invite you into a new world with a glimmer of hope, hidden away in your local library, or children's school.
One of my twin boys is completely head-over-heels about hedgehogs. He was born in Mexico, and his love affair with Britain's
Again, please excuse the title which references the outrageous myth that red hair is a sign of witchcraft. Of course red hair a beautiful gift from God. But as I have said in prior articles, no one ever healed a wound that is consistently being stabbed by ignoring it.
If humanised portrayals increase a child's empathy for animals - and such portrayals are ubiquitous across children's books, cartoons, films and toys - why do those with a positive attitude towards animals occupy such a marginalised position in society?
I hope that my books - and whatever forms the stories may go on to take - will capture the imagination of their readers, create a vehicle for discussing environmental issues, and encourage young people to tackle global challenges by becoming the scientists and engineers of tomorrow.