giving

Truth be told, I'm not really a shaking the bucket type of guy. Then again, thanks to the incredible medical advances over the last 15-20 years in the treatment of this once deadly disease, I'm fortunately not really a kicking the bucket type of guy either.
So wherever you are on Tuesday, let me encourage you to join us in taking time to give, in whatever way is most meaningful to you - to a neighbor in need, to a cause close to your heart, to your local community or to those on the other side of the world.
There are some very simple ways to make a difference. You don't need to undertake an arduous task to do some good. Here are 10 weird and wonderful things you can do to give back and generate some of that much needed feel good factor:
We spend so much time thinking about what others can do for us - or what they aren't doing for us - that we end up strangling off our own energy in the process. Once you learn to give you start to get - physically, mentally, or emotionally.
Today is the official #RAKweek #RandomActsOfKindnessDay. We're so thankful that we see so many acts of kindness every day at foodbanks, and some of them are just so heart-warming that we thought they needed sharing...
I want to challenge conventional wisdom that suggests giving is an antidote to consumerism. Not because I want to knock giving, but because my experience of conducting anthropological research into philanthropy suggests we can better understand it by not viewing it as the polar opposite of consumer activity.
Most of us are born into a world of lack. Unless we are really lucky, we are born into a world where there is scarcity of time, softness and kindness. This scarcity has nothing to do with love or money.
Already in Britain, eight out of 10 people have participated in some kind of charitable giving this year, and it is estimated that the UK will have donated more than £10.6billion to charity by the end of 2015. But how many of us know with any real certainty where our money is going, or how many people will actually see the benefit?
The question 'who do you support?' might bring to mind political parties and sports teams (Chelsea, if you're asking). It's not as often that you hear people discussing the charitable causes they're passionate about. Having a good cause that you support is something I truly believe in.
A pensioner who donated his late wife's wedding dress to a charity shop has said he feels "proud and elated" that it sold