HIV Cure

A new vaccine being tested in South Africa could be the “nail in the coffin” of HIV as it helps to protect people against
2014 has been an extraordinary year for global health and for infectious diseases -for all the right and wrong reasons-which we certainly ought to seriously reflect on. I very much believe that it will be the lessons we learn from this year`s experiences that will help us approach what is shaping up to be nothing less than a momentous 2015 for global health.
My first stop was New Delhi where UNAIDS India and the Government of Victoria hosted a public seminar where I delivered a lecture detailing the progress on work towards an HIV cure. Prior to the seminar I met with journalists from some of the country's leading newspapers and it is my hope we will see some of those outlets reporting on AIDS 2014 from Melbourne.
Four years ago it was proven that if you give people HIV drugs and they take them, their chance of infecting someone else falls by at least 96%. It's stupid to drive into hiding the people you may need to treat to continue your fight against AIDS.
It's been quite a month and I had planned on beginning this blog with an initial reflection on the recent ICAAP conference in Bangkok but that has been superseded by the passing of Nelson Mandela, a champion of the HIV/AIDS cause.
Around one in five people living with HIV in the UK are unaware they have the virus, figures show. Some 21,900 people out
I'm writing this at the tail end of what has been a hectic but extraordinarily energising week on the path to AIDS2014 - I know it's only October 2013 but it is certainly apparent already to me and my colleagues both here in Australia and at the IAS Secretariat in Switzerland that there is already a groundswell of momentum building ahead of the event.
As I flew out from Stockholm to Denver last Wednesday it occurred to me how far we had come in HIV Cure research since the International AIDS Society held the first HIV Cure workshop at the AIDS 2010 conference in Vienna.
Walking into the room, I saw eight people - predominantly doctors - and I could tell that at least five had already made up their minds to reject the project. It started predictably: "Well, we have spent a lot of time discussing this very interesting project, but have some significant concerns." That was why I was there - to allay their fears and get on with this important project. That was not to be.