mourning

So many of us are bereaved and unsure where to turn. Only by grieving together can we move on and heal, writes grief counsellor Lianna Champ.
The Supreme Court justice and women’s rights crusader died on Friday at the age of 87.
Put away those spaghetti straps and Nike swooshes.
A controversy has been playing out in the pages of the Jewish Chronicle over whether animals have souls and whether it is
Attending your first funeral is strange, almost surreal. Speaking at a funeral is even stranger, and as someone who has never practised a faith I almost felt like a fraud. Speaking the words of God, as it were, was a peculiar experience, but I'm glad I did it.
It is clear that mourning and grief are being moved into a digital space. It was happening before developers even realised it; social media became a natural extension of daily life and all its rituals. But what is not clear is if that transition has an impact on the value of those mourning behaviours. Can a virtual candle ever be as meaningful as a real one?
How many times have I seen "Stop it, 2016!" in the past few weeks? Graphs showing the upsurge in celebrity death, memes about George R. R. Martin writing the year, demands to put all sorts of international treasures in cotton wool. But shouldn't we be ready for this?
Anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one and who is also the person in charge of funeral arrangements can relate
For the first few days, my pupils were so large, my eyes looked black. I thought this was because I had seen Death and now even looked as different as I felt. But I discovered that this, too is normal. Powerful emotions like love, or pain, make your pupils dilate. So grief can turn your eyes black. The blue is now, gradually returning.
Jackie Collins had the right to keep her cancer secret from her close family, but it may have been the wrong choice. It was