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Man High On Magic Mushrooms Tears Off Part Of Own Penis

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The man told investigators he had ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms (file picture)
The man told investigators he had ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms (file picture)

A 41-year-old man is in recovering in hospital after tearing off part of his own penis while under the influence of "magic" mushrooms.

Police were called after the man was found naked and bloodied outside a school in Columbus, Ohio, Ann Arbor.com reported.

Sgt Geoff Fox said the man had broken a window at the school at 1am, which set off an alarm, summoning the police.

“He mutilated his genitals with his bare hands. He was doing a lot of yelling and screaming," Sgt Fox said.

He added the man, who was rushed to hospital along with his mutilated body part, did not have a previous history of mental health problems or drug use.

The man later told investigators he had picked up hallucinogenic mushrooms earlier in the day while he was in town visiting friends, the Detroit Free Press reports.

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It quotes Sgt Fox as saying the man had been close to death, following the incident last week.

“In terms of vital signs, they were as low as they could go without being dead, I could only assume due to the blood loss and the shock and trauma to the body,” he revealed.

He added blood tests are being carried out to see if the mushrooms may have been laced with something else.

No further details are known about the man's current condition.

"Magic" mushrooms are so-called because they contain the hallucinogen psilocybin which can cause sounds and colours to become distorted, emotions to heighten and time to appear both speeded up and slowed down.

A typical magic mushroom trip tends to last between four and 10 hours, says the NHS.

Last year it was announced a controversial clinical trial of "magic mushroom therapy" could take place in the UK, following two ground-breaking studies.

Doctors plan to treat depressed patients who cannot be helped by modern drugs or behaviour-based psychotherapy with the active ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Psilocybin would slowly be infused into their bloodstreams while they receive a carefully tailored "talking therapy", hopes Professor David Nutt, from Imperial College London, who three years ago was sacked as the Government's chief drug adviser.