WARNING: OFFENSIVE LANGUAGE

A YouTube video has been posted of a man launching into a shocking racist attack on a London Underground train.

The unidentified man left tube passengers horrified after he claimed that the Japanese are a "vicious bunch of f****** c****."

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Claiming that his uncle died in the River Kwai during World War II, he can be seen aggressively pointing his finger at a female passenger and accusing her of torturing him.

"You tortured him. Get yourself off the train, get yourself off the train. You’re nasty people, yeah? F*** off, get out of my country. Sayonara," he can be heard saying.

The man, who appears to be under the influence of alcohol, then turns his attention to the person filming the footage and asks where he comes from.

The passenger replies: "Does it matter, really? Are you going to start sorting everyone on the train, man, one by one? What have you got against the Japanese?

"She didn’t kill your relatives, did she? Why is she going to apologise, what has she done to you?"

The man's illogical argument escalates, despite the passenger's best efforts to calm him down, and he can be heard becoming increasingly violent, even threatening to punch the cameraman.

"I’m ex-Parachute Regiment! What do you know about history? Why do you f****** jabber when you know nothing? Shut up. You know two-thirds of f*** all," he says.

Glugging from a wine bottle, he says: "I’ve done two tours in Northern Ireland and the Falklands. Don’t even f****** look at me."

He then approaches the stunned tube passenger, dangling the wine bottle in his face.

"Do you want some of that?" he asks. "No, because you don’t drink. You’re a f****** Somalian c***."

The shocking incident is not the first of its kind, echoing the drunken antics of passenger Jacqueline Woodhouse who was jailed for 21 weeks after hurling racist abuse at fellow Tube travellers.

The 42-year-old former secretary launched an expletive-laden rant at passengers on the Central line, telling those seated near her: "I used to live in England and now I live in the United Nations."