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Glastonbury Pictures Reveal What 120,000 People All Left Behind At Festival Site

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The giant clean-up operation at Glastonbury was beginning today as more than 120,000 festival-goers were leaving the site.

Many of those travelling home were caught up in delays as the country roads around the Somerset site became clogged up with traffic, although organisers said they were not as bad as expected.

After five days of tumultuous weather which saw torrential rain, hail, thunder and lightning lead to the plug being pulled on the Pyramid Stage, campers packed up their tents under bright sunshine.

Highlights of the musical extravaganza have included Dolly Parton, Metallica and Arcade Fire, while Kasabian made sure the festival went out with a bang last night as they headlined the Pyramid Stage when they were joined on stage by comedian Noel Fielding. With the festival over for another year, bets are already being offered on next year's event, with Paddy Power installing Depeche Mode as the 3/1 favourites to headline on the Saturday.

Story Continues Below Pictures...

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    A festival goer lying on the ground as the clean up operation begins around the Pyramid Stage, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    Festival goers walk past bagged-up litter strewn around the Pyramid Stage area as the clean up operation begins, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    The litter strewn around the Pyramid Stage area as the clean up operation begins on site, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    A festival goer lying on the ground as the clean up operation begins around the Pyramid Stage, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    The litter strewn around the Pyramid Stage area as the clean up operation begins on site, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    A festival goer grabs some last minute sleep as campers start packing up to leave the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    Police officers walk amongst the litter strewn around the Pyramid Stage area as the clean up operation begins, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset.
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers begin to leave the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers begin to leave the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers begin to leave the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers begin to leave the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Litter pickers clear the rubbish left in front of the main Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers rest besides their tent at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Litter pickers clear the rubbish left in front of the main Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers begin to leave the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Festival goers rest besides their tent at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Litter pickers clear the rubbish left in front of the main Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Pilton on June 30, 2014 near Glastonbury, England. Festival goers were today leaving the Somerset dairy farm that plays host to one of the largest music festivals in the world. Tickets to the event, which is now in its 44th year, sold out in minutes even before any of the headline acts had been confirmed. The festival, which started in 1970 when several hundred hippies paid £1, now attracts more than 175,000 people. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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    Revellers begin the long journey home as the sun rises on the morning after the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts on Worthy Farm in Somerset, south-west England, on June 30, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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    Tents, equipment and debris litter the camping fields on the morning after the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts on Worthy Farm in Somerset, south-west England, on June 30, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    Tents, equipment and debris litter the camping fields on the morning after the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts on Worthy Farm in Somerset, south-west England, on June 30, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    Tents, equipment and debris litter the camping fields on the morning after the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts on Worthy Farm in Somerset, south-west England, on June 30, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Getty Images
    Revellers begin the long journey home as the sun rises on the morning after the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts on Worthy Farm in Somerset, south-west England, on June 30, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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    A man reads his Sunday newspaper as revellers wake on the last day of the Glastonbury Festival of Music and Performing Arts in Somerset, southwest England, on June 29, 2014. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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    Festivalgoers use recycling bins at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
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    Rubbish is deposited at the recycling centre, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
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    Recycling bins at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
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    Rubbish is deposited at the recycling centre, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
  • PA
    Rubbish is deposited at the recycling centre, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
  • PA
    Recycling bins at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.
  • PA
    Volunteers sort waste at the recycling centre, at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. All waste on site is sorted into recycling groups by volunteers working 5-hour shifts, in a process that will take up to three weeks to clean up the whole farm.

The bookmakers is also offering odds of 5/1 that Prince will play with the same on Fleetwood Mac, Oasis and the Eagles.

With the party officially over, campers have until 6pm to leave the site of the festival at Worthy Farm, Somerset, while crew and stall holders are given a week to clear their property.

Organisers said the priority for today is to get ticket-holders off site before the clean-up can begin in earnest tomorrow.

A litter picking crew of up to 800 will begin to clear the huge site of rubbish, while volunteers began sifting through recycling yesterday.

Tractors carrying magnetic strips will travel across the 1,200-acre site to pick up tent pegs while workers will carry out a fingertip search to make sure no inch of the land goes unchecked.

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The mission to convert the land back into a functioning dairy could take up to six weeks. Yesterday organiser Michael Eavis said the 44th Glastonbury Festival had been a "great success again, in spite of the mud" and he already has next year's headliners sorted.

The farmer, who put on the first festival at his farm in 1970, was sworn to secrecy about who the acts were, but said one band was not British and Prince was not among them.

Asked about Metallica's controversial top spot on the Pyramid Stage last night, he said the heavy metallers had played "like their lives depended on it".

Asked about the future of the festival, the 78-year-old, who organises the mammoth event with his daughter Emily, said: "We've got a few more years.

"Myself, I think I can run another six years, which would take me up to about 50 years.. and then see what happens after that."

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