NEWS

Scottish Referendum Video Provokes Claims From Cybernats That Vote Was Rigged

19/09/2014 09:57 | Updated 19 September 2014

Scottish nationalists have been told to "get a grip" after complaining that the outcome of the referendum vote was rigged.

After David Cameron this morning said that the debate surrounding independence has now been "settled for a generation... perhaps for a lifetime," angry pro-indy supporters vented their frustrations.

The angry reaction is somewhat unsurprising given the hostile nature of the debate in the final days of the divisive campaign.

After baying mobs, death threats to politicians, voters being threatened and reporters in need of security guards - it's no wonder that the end of the referendum will be a welcome relief to most today.

But, despite desperate pledges from the main three party leaders, it looks as though team Yes isn't going to give up quietly.

A video also emerged that nationalists said "proves" the referendum was rigged:

A conspiracy theory that was promptly dismissed...

Others, meanwhile, responded to the accusations of the result being fixed with exasperation, telling those concerned that "this is Scotland, not Sudan."

Meanwhile, officials at the referendum count in Glasgow are investigating 10 cases of suspected electoral fraud at polling stations after Glasgow City Council said police had been called earlier today.

They said it related to possible cases of impersonation, where people pretend to be someone else, cast the vote, then the real person turned up to vote.

Stewart Hosie, SNP Treasury spokesman at Westminster, said it was "very sad that people feel the need to engage in any kind of impersonation".

He told Sky News: "I think that's a daft thing to do.

"The ballot papers have been identified, they will be taken away and fingerprinted, the police will do their job and I'm sure whoever has done it will be caught and sentenced.

"That's the correct procedure. It won't change the result but of course it shouldn't have happened, it is a silly, silly, thing for anyone to try to do."

Police Scotland said there was an ongoing investigation into a "small number" of ballot papers which had been compromised.

A Police Scotland spokesman said: "Police Scotland takes the safety and security of the independence referendum extremely seriously and is working with partner agencies including local authorities and the Chief Counting Officer to ensure the integrity of the ballot.

"Any crime committed will be investigated appropriately."

READ MORE

Suggest a correction
177 Comments

CONVERSATIONS