COMEDY

#ResignCameron Hashtag Is Coming Up With Thousands Of Reasons The Prime Minister Should Step Aside

Things aren't going great for the PM right now.

08/04/2016 09:41 | Updated 08 April 2016

David Cameron is being called on to resign after he admitted to previously holding shares in his father’s offshore trust which was thrust into the spotlight during the Panama Papers scandal.

Following on from the resignation of Iceland’s prime minister on Tuesday, thousands of Britons are hoping to convince the PM to step down by posting jokes and memes.

But some aren't so sure about the prospect of Cameron stepping aside...

Others think it's been a long time coming:

And some just questioned his investments.

The hashtag has now turned into a petition calling on the prime minister to resign over "deception and conflict of interest," and has spawned several protests planned to hit Downing Street on Saturday.

David Cameron admitted owning the stocks and shares in his father's investments in an interview with ITV News on Thursday, but insisted he sold them all for £30,000 in 2010.

A profit made of just over £19,000 was below the couple’s joint capital gains allowance of £20,200 - meaning they did not have to pay capital gains tax.

He said: "Of course I did own stocks and shares in the past - quite naturally because my father was a stockbroker.

"I sold them all in 2010, because if I was going to become Prime Minister I didn't want anyone to say 'you have other agendas, vested interests.'

"Samantha and I had a joint account. We owned 5,000 units in Blairmore Investment Trust, which we sold in January 2010. That was worth something like £30,000."

This latest Twitter trend comes less than 24 hours after #CurseDavidCameron took over the social media platform, which saw people suggesting hilariously British curses to be laid on the PM.

 Some of our favourites included "may you constantly forget about your tea until it is unpleasantly tepid" and "may your Waitrose be forever out of quinoa".

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