Global Health

Football Fever: Leveraging the Power of Sport to Fight Malaria

Hervé Verhoosel | Posted 12.07.2014 | UK Sport
Hervé Verhoosel

The World Cup will come to a close on Sunday, but our fight against this killer disease will continue. Despite tremendous progress that has seen death rates decreasing by more than 40% globally and almost 50% in Africa alone since 2000, almost half of the world's population is still at risk from malaria.

Harnessing the Digital Sharing Revolution to Save Lives

Dr Trudie Lang | Posted 09.07.2014 | UK Tech
Dr Trudie Lang

Today is a big day for the Global Health Network, as we launch the Global Health Research Process Map. This is the first digital toolkit designed to enable researchers anywhere in the world to conduct rigorous global health research. It offers step-by-step guidance for planning successful global health research projects and has the potential to revolutionise the current process, speeding the development of new research and therapies.

The Global Challenges of Dementia

Beth Britton | Posted 27.06.2014 | UK Politics
Beth Britton

Dementia is a huge topic, encompassing many different aspects that stray into the territories of (in no particular order) healthcare, social care, science, community, family life, wider society, therapeutic practitioners, the voluntary sector, academia, finance, pharmaceuticals and yes, politics. 'Ownership' of it is hotly contested - it is a health issue, a care issue, something that governments must lead on or something that only the individuals living with it, and their families, truly understand?

Why Investing in Malaria Control Matters for the Muslim World

Hervé Verhoosel | Posted 27.06.2014 | UK
Hervé Verhoosel

The small bite of an infected mosquito caused an estimated 207 million cases of malaria in largely developing countries around the world each year. Almost half of these cases occur in predominantly Muslim countries belonging to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC)...

Generation NCD: Searching For the Scientists to Tackle Africa's Next Healthcare Challenge

James Shannon | Posted 27.07.2014 | UK
James Shannon

Africa and its healthcare needs are changing. As its economic landscape shifts, burgeoning wealth co-exists with extreme poverty. While infectious diseases like malaria and HIV still place huge pressure on Africa, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer and diabetes pose an increasing threat.

Extreme Collaboration: How Charity and Business Can Work Together

Allan Pamba | Posted 19.07.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Partnerships of any kind - be they romantic or professional - are never straightforward. There are differences of opinion that it can be difficult to reconcile and different ways of working can cause tension...

Three Ideas to Accelerate the Fight Against Malaria

Allan Pamba | Posted 24.06.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Malaria is obstinate. A massive effort by the international community along with the determination of committed individuals, scientists, health workers , governments, charities and other organisations have made a huge dent on its impact. Globally, cases are down 25%, deaths are down 42% since 2000 - but malaria is far from gone.

The Road From Aid to Trade: Investing in a Healthier Future for Africa

Allan Pamba | Posted 09.06.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

At the EU-Africa business summit I attended last week, a question that I heard again and again is what are the barriers to investing more in sub-Saharan Africa?

Unsafe Surgery Is a Global Crisis Silencing Millions of Women Around the World - Let's Talk About It

Sarah Kessler | Posted 06.05.2014 | UK
Sarah Kessler

International Women's Day is an artificial construct, but so is a banana split. It's still a rare and delightful invitation to sit down with a spoon or a microphone and talk about issues that affect women around the world.

To Combat Cancer in Developing Countries, We Must Learn The Lessons of HIV And Malaria

Allan Pamba | Posted 08.04.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Think of disease in Africa and you maybe think of malaria. But this is not the whole picture. In Africa and across developing countries, people are living longer and their lifestyles are changing. With this shift, a different threat is emerging...

Cruel Cut Aftermath, Space For FGM Survivors

Leyla Hussein | Posted 07.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Leyla Hussein

Today we Mark FGM Zero Tolerance Day - 6 February is a reminder that female genital mutilation is a global issue; it should not, however, be the only day we remember that. Sadly, every minute five girls undergo FGM. If it takes you a couple of minutes to read this blog, by the time you're finished 10 girls will or more have been irreversibly mutilated.

Tackling Obesity and Hidden Hunger: How Industry Can Step Up

Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer | Posted 15.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer

Cancer. Stroke. Heart disease. Diabetes. These and other noncommunicable diseases are becoming leading causes of death and disease worldwide. And nutrition plays a significant role.

No Laughing Matter; Lunch With Desmond Tutu

Brigid McConville | Posted 12.02.2014 | UK
Brigid McConville

With the recent loss of Nelson Mandela, South African found its voice - and during the memorial service, its silence - in Desmond Tutu. He was Mandela's ally through so many decades of struggle. He remains a hugely respected scourge of the world's wrongs, and irrepressible champion of the oppressed.

We Must Take a Comprehensive Approach to Tackling HIV and Aids

Martin Drewry | Posted 29.01.2014 | UK
Martin Drewry

More must be done to address the political, social and economic injustices which perpetuate vulnerability to HIV.

G8 Dementia Summit: The World Is Watching

Beth Britton | Posted 28.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Beth Britton

If you haven't been personally touched by dementia you may be wondering why it deserves this platform. Why aren't other diseases afforded the same global attention you may ask? But that's just it, they have been.

Developing Countries Are Finding Innovative Solutions to Their Health Challenges

Allan Pamba | Posted 25.01.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Malawi might not spring to mind as a hot-bed of healthcare innovation. Neither might Bangladesh or Colombia. But that view is changing. All over developing countries, determined people are finding brilliant and creative solutions for long-standing problems. ..

Surge in Diabetes Bigger Than Predicted

Dr Paul Zollinger-Read | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Dr Paul Zollinger-Read

Currently standing at 382million, the number of people affected by diabetes is expected to rocket to 592million by 2035 - that's a 55% increase in just over 20 years.

When It Comes To Global Health You Need Human Resources To Save Human Lives

Bidisha | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Bidisha

The World Health Organisation is making a strong move to tackle a common and vital theme in all its global health initiatives, an issue which, if ill-managed, would jeopardise even the best intentioned and best planned projects: human resources for health. The effective recruitment, education, support, deployment and distribution of human resources is a key factor in achieving the goal of universal health coverage.

World Food Day: Food Aid Is Not a Long-Term Solution

Sarah K Edwards | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Sarah K Edwards

Indigenous children in Peru are growing up stunted and with cognitive impairments, and food aid programmes are part of the problem. For the Ashanink...

The Right to Health, the Forgotten Right?

Martin Drewry | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Martin Drewry

As the world debates human rights this Blog Action Day, I'd hazard a guess as to which of the great human rights will get one of the lowest word counts. Well, let's try and raise it up a little. Health. Health. Health. Health. Health. Health. Health.

On International Day of the Girl, It's Time to Remember That Girls Should Be Students, Not Brides

Lakshmi Sundaram | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Politics
Lakshmi Sundaram

Kidan from Ethiopia was eagerly awaiting the day when she would be able to complete her education and fulfil her lifelong dream of becoming a doctor. But she was instead promised in marriage in exchange for cattle...

Meet Kanchi Tamang, Nepalese Waste Picker

Bidisha | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Bidisha

Kanchi Tamang is a waste-picker in Nepal. A mother and a grandmother, she works long hours in unsafe and unclean conditions for a pittance. After contracting Hepatitis C, then developing painful gallstones, she faces the prospect of medical treatment that will require her to be absent from work and hospital bills that, together with the loss of work income, might mean that she loses her home and cannot support her family. Yet if she does not receive treatment, she might lose her life, not just her livelihood.

Innovation in the Name of Global Partnership: What the Private Sector Must Bring to the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Duncan Learmouth | Posted 24.09.2013 | UK
Duncan Learmouth

The shortage of health workers is one of the most fundamental barriers to improving health in developing countries. A fully trained and well-supported community health worker like Saley can deliver treatments and provide health education to 5,000 children a year.

No Mother Left Behind - What the Millenium Development Goals Mean for the Mothers of the Central African Republic

Laura Jepson | Posted 17.11.2013 | UK
Laura Jepson

This week marks 100 days since the report of the high level panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. As eminent persons and development academics once again turn their thoughts to what will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), it's worth remembering what these debates really mean for mothers and babies in Sub-Saharan Africa.

It's Decision Time in the Fight Against Aids, TB and Malaria

Adrian Lovett | Posted 17.11.2013 | UK Politics
Adrian Lovett

The debate about the quantity of Britain's aid budget was settled earlier this year when the government delivered on its promise to invest 0.7% of our national income in fighting poverty and disease - a decision that, contrary to what the cynics insist, had the support of the majority of British people.