UK Language

Do You Know What These 'Bizarre' English Phrases Mean?

The Huffington Post | Sarah Harris1 | Posted 18.03.2016 | UK

Many foreigners coming to Britain are often left scratching their heads at some of our strange turns of phrase - but even Britons themselves sometimes...

This Is What Happens When You Break Down The World's Population Into 100 People

The Huffington Post | Sarah Harris1 | Posted 15.03.2016 | UK

If The World Were 100 People | GOOD DataWhen you shrink the world's population down to 100 people, this is what you get:Posted by GOOD on Monday, 14 M...

That First School Trip Abroad

Kathryn Berens | Posted 11.03.2016 | UK Parents
Kathryn Berens

In approximately 1 hour and 27 minutes my son will land back at Gatwick after his first trip abroad with the school. Approximately is not accurate, in exactly 1 hour and 27 minutes my son will land - how do I know this? Because I am his mother and I have been counting down the minutes until his return. I am under no illusions that he has been doing the same.

Language in School: If You Don't Understand, How Can You Learn

Aaron Benavot | Posted 19.02.2016 | UK Politics
Aaron Benavot

How a country chooses the language for its education system is not an easy process. The decision is usually influenced by multiple factors: colonial h...

Men's Issues with Women

Mia Doring | Posted 18.02.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Mia Doring

All that the inaccurate term "Women's Issues" does is help "good" men stay passive or otherwise ignore it, while telling all women that these "issues" are their problem to deal with and nobody else's. Let's be real and name them what the are; "Men's Issues with Women".

10 Useful Words for Work

Nick Liddell | Posted 22.01.2016 | UK
Nick Liddell

As Joseph Schumpeter famously pointed out: things get broken all the time. That's part of the fun. And the ability to pick up broken pieces and turn them into something beautiful and useful is perhaps the true defining quality of a leader.

Be More British, Speak More English, Dress Like This - Another Normal Week for British Muslim Women

Dr Chris Allen | Posted 20.01.2016 | UK
Dr Chris Allen

A forceful and vengeful political vehicle that seeks to differentiate, demarcate and subsequently discriminate against Muslims and their communities this week's political approaches and their appropriation of British Muslim women are little different.

'Extremism' and Muslim Women - When Did Language Come into Play?

Yasmin Khatun Dewan | Posted 20.01.2016 | UK Politics
Yasmin Khatun Dewan

The Prime Minister accepts that there is no clausal link to language and extremism but still resolved to make the link during his proposal. It might be an idea to look at credible strains of opinion around what leads to 'extremist' thought before he lays out his next proposal.

Don't Link Muslim Women Who Don't Speak English To Extremism, Cameron Warned

The Huffington Post UK | Sarah Ann Harris | Posted 18.01.2016 | UK

David Cameron has been accused of conflating education with radicalisation after announcing a £20m fund to improve the English skills of Muslim women...

What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape

Mia Doring | Posted 11.01.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Mia Doring

Rape means rape. Rape means putting a penis or other object inside a person against their will. This is not sex, it is rape, and it is the furthest thing from the meaning of sex. Calling rape "sex" is like saying that the boa constrictor gave the rat an unwanted hug. Or that a punch is a forced facial caress. Or that burglary is "forced giving". It makes no sense and it is damaging.

Why I Won't Censor My Language For My Kids

Hannah Clarke | Posted 07.01.2016 | UK Parents
Hannah Clarke

What I am reading more and more is that we basically have to walk on egg shells with our children for fear that we are going to forever damage their self image. I prefer to think that by telling Toby and soon his sister that they are all of the above things that they will believe me, they will know that they are loved and they will feel confident.

Learn, Apprendre, Imparare, Aprender, Lernen

Kate Holliday | Posted 17.12.2015 | UK Universities & Education
Kate Holliday

Recently, I was asked to help a young student in my school from France with some of her classes. She's in the process of learning English, but isn't q...

In Ireland: English as a Foreign Language

Layli Foroudi | Posted 26.11.2015 | UK Comedy
Layli Foroudi

If someone says "I'm after going to the shop" it means "I just went to the shop", which I guess makes sense because you are now inhabiting a time, after going to the shop.. but when first hearing it I had no idea what was going on.

The Fight For Cantonese

Sarah Kwong | Posted 26.11.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Sarah Kwong

We all know that language is more than just a set of words. It's the backbone of an entire population, providing an identity, connection to history and a togetherness. So it's no surprise that many Hong Kongers are feeling adrift right now.

Puting the 'Y' in Dysability

Simon Stevens | Posted 19.11.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Simon Stevens

Dysability basically means a difficulty in ability, and I believe this is more in line with the social model. Impairments are the biological differences we have that are mostly perceived to negatively affect our function.

Why We Need to Change the Way We Use the Word 'Mental'

Mariel Norton | Posted 10.11.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Mariel Norton

I was reading a magazine the other day and in two separate stories, the word mental was used to describe a derogative issue. One used it in reference to a violent night out while the other was used to highlight an acrimonious breakup - both which denote pessimistic outcomes.

Six Tips for Cultivating Confidence

Karen Pine | Posted 06.11.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Karen Pine

I am currently conducting a survey into confidence and one of the things I'm interested in is the way a person's body is when they lack confidence. They tend to slump, they withdraw physically, their head drops and their eyes look away.

Five Aussies Who Prove A Link Between Accent And Alcohol

The Huffington Post UK | Sarah Ann Harris | Posted 28.10.2015 | UK

The Australian accent developed from a “drunken slur”, according to to a communications experts from Down Under. Dean Frenkel, a public speakin...

Bilingualism: Social Phenomenon or Dangerous Trend?

J.N. Paquet | Posted 29.09.2015 | UK Politics
J.N. Paquet

Some people -- mainly ultra-conservative politicians -- say that the social phenomenon that is bilingualism is a danger for a nation's unity and claim...

Getting Down With the Kids...

Kathryn Berens | Posted 25.09.2015 | UK Parents
Kathryn Berens

I am finding it increasingly difficult to understand a word my children say. I feel I am probably not alone in this and so here it is - my guide to navigating the minefield of conversation with your children.

Why Your Minority Students Need Role Models - And Where to Find Them

Tatiana August-Schmidt | Posted 23.09.2015 | UK
Tatiana August-Schmidt

There is a growing mismatch between the diversity of students and teachers in schools across England. In 2014, nearly 30 per cent of pupils in state-f...

The Language of Autism

Jo Worgan | Posted 13.08.2015 | UK Parents
Jo Worgan

Many parents have asked that I use the term 'with autism' rather than 'autistic', as they feel that they are 'labeling' their child. I do not see it in that way. No matter if you say 'autistic' or 'with autism', or even 'on the spectrum', ultimately they all mean the same thing, well they do to me anyway.

Why Bilingual Education Is Expanding Our World

Preetam Kaushik | Posted 13.08.2015 | UK
Preetam Kaushik

English is necessary. But to what extent? All the way? Just because something is not in every day usage doesn't mean that it is not being used elsewhere and may not one day come in handy for you.

Do You See What I'm Saying? The Link Between Visual Culture and Empathy

Debbi Evans | Posted 06.08.2015 | UK Tech
Debbi Evans

People who are actively engaged in social media - and young people in particular - are constantly aware of their audience and their role as entertainers. Images leave much unsaid and open to interpretation, so their meaning and intention can be defended in line with audience feedback and the threat of social shame.

If You Want To Succeed in Life, Learn to Play Scrabble

Jason Aiginitis | Posted 23.07.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Jason Aiginitis

This is genuinely inspirational stuff - if you want to succeed at life, the story of Scrabble teaches us the importance of lateral thinking, of letting ideas breathe and evolve, and of drawing from the expertise of others.