Unicef

Nepal - One Year On and Children Still Desperately Need Our Help

Ewan McGregor | Posted 26.04.2016 | UK Entertainment
Ewan McGregor

In the days following the earthquake, despite the snow and freezing temperature, families were forced to sleep outside, scared to go indoors because of the damage to buildings and the threat of aftershocks. After the earthquakes many families had no choice but to sleep out in the open. The earthquakes not only destroyed their homes and their schools, but left millions of children scared and in danger. They needed shelter; food, water and medical supplies, and also support to deal with the traumatic events they had experienced, and the chance to get back to school as soon as possible.

These Shocking Statistics Show British Children Are 'Falling Behind'

The Huffington Post | George Bowden | Posted 14.04.2016 | UK Universities & Education

Child inequality is worse in the UK than many other developed countries, a damning study by Unicef says. The UN's body for children found "concerning ...

Children Used as Suicide Bombers - The Latest Horrific Tactic of Boko Haram

Lily Caprani | Posted 13.04.2016 | UK
Lily Caprani

Since the time when the girls were taken from their school by armed militiamen, the impact of the conflict on children has grown dramatically. Over the past year, 44 children have been used as suicide bombers. In fact, the number of children used in suicide attacks has increased ten-fold over the last year and over 75% of the children involved in the attacks are girls. Nearly one out of every five suicide bombers is a child.

Changing the Conversation Around Breastfeeding

Sue Ashmore | Posted 11.04.2016 | UK Parents
Sue Ashmore

We need to change the conversation. We can stop laying the blame for a major public health issue in the laps of individual women, and acknowledge the collective responsibility of us all to remove the barriers to breastfeeding which lead to eight out of ten women reporting they had to stop breastfeeding before they had wanted to.

Malnutrition in Sudan: An interview with UNICEF's Talal Mahjoub

Yousra Elbagir | Posted 05.04.2016 | UK
Yousra Elbagir

Sudan has one of the highest malnutrition rates in the Middle East and North Africa region. For the last forty years, one third of the population has suffered from irreversible chronic malnutrition - a life-long growth condition that has consistently plagued Sudanese children since 1987.

Emma Sinclair: On a Mission to Boost Entrepreneurship Across the Globe

Annabel Denham | Posted 01.04.2016 | UK
Annabel Denham

Successful entrepreneurs often find themselves pigeonholed by conventional assumptions and stereotypes. Oft viewed as obsessive workaholics, they are seemingly afflicted with a ruthless tenacity and single-mindedness verging on the blinkered. Movies like The Social Network or TV shows such as The Apprentice haven't helped. Neither has Donald Trump's showmanship.

Women's History Month: The Forgotten Women of Syria

Thaslima Begum | Posted 31.03.2016 | UK
Thaslima Begum

Syrian refugee women are facing serious human rights violations, exploitation and gender-based violence on a daily basis.

Syrian Children Sleep in the Mud at a Balkan Border

Rajae Msefer Berrada | Posted 18.03.2016 | UK
Rajae Msefer Berrada

Governments need to be reminded of their obligation to allow safe and legal channels for children escaping war and conflict through appropriate measures including family reunification, so they do not suffer more.

Five Years of War and Heartbreak: Why We All Must Do More to Keep Syria's Children Safe

Michael Sheen | Posted 14.03.2016 | UK
Michael Sheen

Five years, for any child, feels like a lifetime. For the millions of Syrian children whose lives have been turned upside down by the conflict, these last five years must have felt even longer than that. The conflict in Syria has now raged for half a decade, and in this time the millions of children affected have had to deal with more suffering and heartbreak than most of us will ever experience. The conflict has placed millions of children in terrible danger, and sadly a real end to the turmoil still seems a distant prospect. More than eight million Syrian children are now in urgent need of humanitarian aid in what is the greatest humanitarian crisis since World War II.

Improving the Lives of Women and Girls Across Tea Communities

Sarah Roberts | Posted 08.03.2016 | UK
Sarah Roberts

Today is International Women's Day, a celebration of the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women around the world. The day also exists to remind people that globally there is still much to be done to accelerate gender parity.

Here's How Mobile Innovation Can Help End Poverty

Philip Ellis | Posted 25.02.2016 | UK Tech
Philip Ellis

The digital inclusion conversation isn't limited to emerging markets, says Cairns; there are 90 million people in Europe who don't have a bank account or any digital means of payment, rendering travel by train or plane virtually impossible.

The Most Amazing Woman in the World

Luke Cameron | Posted 25.01.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Luke Cameron

Throughout my Nicest Job journey I have met some incredible people - but one of those people stick out more than all the others. This week I am going to tell you about Maria.

Rebuilding the Lives of Children in Liberia After Ebola

Lily Caprani | Posted 13.01.2016 | UK
Lily Caprani

For now, the epidemic is officially over and families and communities are beginning to rebuild their lives, but the work of organisations such as Unicef remains as important as ever. Even before the Ebola outbreak, Liberia had one of the highest child mortality rates in the world, and combatting this continues to be one of our biggest challenges in the country.

David Beckham Honoured At Unicef Ball (And Looked Pretty Good In A Suit, Too)

The Huffington Post UK | Rosy Cherrington | Posted 13.01.2016 | UK Style

David Beckham, Selena Gomez, Mariah Carey and Nicole Kidman were just some of the stars sporting very stylish outfits on the red carpet at the Unicef ...

In My New Role, Children Across the World Who Face Violence, Disease, Hunger and the Chaos of War Are at the Front of My Mind

Kirsty Young | Posted 12.01.2016 | UK
Kirsty Young

This year, I am thrilled to step into my new role as president of Unicef UK, the world's leading children's organisation. It's a real privilege to follow in the footsteps of Lord Paddy Ashdown who has been in the position for the last six years. As we welcome in the New Year and reflect on another Christmas filled with family, friends, food and presents, it's easy to forget about those who are less fortunate than us. This year, in my new role for Unicef UK, children across the world who face violence, disease, hunger and the chaos of war are at the front of my mind.

Building a Future for Young People in a Global Unemployment Crisis

David Bull | Posted 01.12.2015 | UK
David Bull

Isobel takes an order at her shop © Unicef/ Francois D'Elbee The world is facing a worsening youth unemployment crisis with almost 73 million young...

Polio - Almost History

David Bull | Posted 29.11.2015 | UK
David Bull

The hard-won battle to eradicate polio once and for all is within our grasp but we can't relax yet. We must, maintain and accelerate our efforts. So it is heartening to see Commonwealth countries, including the UK, coming together this weekend at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Malta to review the results achieved to date and call for renewed global support.

The Paris Climate Talks Must Protect Our Children

Simon Reeve | Posted 29.11.2015 | UK
Simon Reeve

It is difficult to properly understand climate change. The scientific jargon, sheer scale and global nature of the crisis it represents can lead to confusion and incomprehension but, perhaps more than anything, it is hard to appreciate how tackling this fundamental challenge will change the way in which we lead our lives. More than this, how do we even begin to comprehend the consequences of climate change for our children and the generations that will come after them?

Building Long-Term Partnerships to Create Lasting Change for Children

David Bull | Posted 18.11.2015 | UK
David Bull

The ways that charities and businesses work together are changing. The notion of corporates supporting a cause with the sole objective of good publicity is slowly diminishing. Gone too, are the days of non-profits working with companies purely as a means to an end to generate funds...

This Muslim Woman Is Beating Online Trolls By Inadvertently Making Them Help Unicef

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 12.11.2015 | UK Tech

If there's one thing online trolls hate doing, it's being nice to anyone. Well now Dr Susan Carland is making sure that every time an online troll ...

As Conflict Takes Its Toll in Ukraine, Young Minds Must Thrive Again

Toby Fricker | Posted 04.11.2015 | UK
Toby Fricker

As long as the conflict remains unsolved, many young Ukrainian lives are on hold. I recall what Dasha told me in the village. "I will remember this year for the rest of my life. I feel like I've lived 10-years in one because it was so tense." Her experiences will clearly never be forgotten. But with the right support, Dasha and young Ukrainians affected by the conflict can thrive once again.

Keeping Children Safe in Emergencies

David Bull | Posted 04.11.2015 | UK
David Bull

At the beginning of this year I remember being shocked and saddened by the fact that 2014 had been the most dangerous year for children to date. I had hoped that the situation for children across the world could only get better...

Protecting Children in the Sandstorm of Za'atari

Lily Caprani | Posted 29.10.2015 | UK
Lily Caprani

Each day, new lives are arriving here in the substitute maternity unit in Za'atari, while hundreds more are being killed every day eight miles away in Syria. We alone can't give the children of Syria what they need the most - ceasefire and peace - but we can protect their lives, their bodies and their minds from further harm and help them survive yet another bitter winter here in the Jordanian desert.

Why Unicef's 'Baby-Friendly Initiative' Isn't Baby-Friendly At All

Madeleine Morris | Posted 28.10.2015 | UK Parents
Madeleine Morris

The Baby-Friendly Initiative is Unicef's hospital breastfeeding program. Its aim is to make hospitals more breastfeeding-friendly places - an admirable goal... Unfortunately, this well-intentioned effort to make institutions more breastfeeding friendly has led to bottle-feeding mothers being ignored.

Syrian Parents Torn Between Tough Decisions for the Future of Their Young Ones

Razan Rashidi | Posted 19.10.2015 | UK
Razan Rashidi

Many parents in Syria worry about sending their children to school because of the dangers on the road to or at school itself. In 2014 alone, at least 60 schools were attacked, sometimes deliberately. In total, 5,000 schools cannot be used for this year. This is because they have been destroyed, damaged, converted to shelter the displaced families or used by the warring parties.