STUDENTS
16/07/2015 08:03 BST | Updated 16/07/2015 09:59 BST

Doritos Roulette Crisps Are So Spicy They Made A Schoolgirl Stop Breathing

They are advertised as being "so spicy it may bring you to tears", but the Doritos Roulette crisps caused a schoolgirl to stop breathing after she ate one.

The ultra spicy tortilla chip, which is marketed as "the UK's hottest ever crisp", is coated in coated in chilli and 10 times hotter than a jalapeño.

George Pindar School, in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, has now had to warn parents about the crisps after one of its students was taken ill. The 15-year-old girl was eating a bag of the Doritos Roulette, which are made up of mostly cheese-flavoured chips, when she came across the fiery snack, which agitated a pre-existing medical condition, the Sun reported.

A spokesperson for the school said: "In relation to the cautionary note in our newsletter with regard to the Dorito Roulettes it was placed in there after an incident with a student where they had experienced some difficulty breathing after eating one.

"The student had a preexisting respiratory condition which clearly made them sensitive to the ‘hot’ element of the Doritos chip."

Michael Walford, Doritos marketing manager said: "Doritos have always been a social snack to share with friends but Doritos Roulette really steps it up a notch.

"There’s a warning on the pack for a reason – the invisible hot chips are exactly that. They’re hotter than most of the spiciest dishes out there so you’re going to want to have a glass of milk at the ready in case you get one!"

Various media outlets have reported the snack, which measures 78,000 scoville units, is so hot it has been banned in America by the food standards agency.

A Doritos spokesperson told HuffPost UK: "We warn people to expect a seriously spicy experience with Doritos Roulette and we make this clear on the pack and in our adverts. The front of the pack states 'Warning: Some of these chips are ultra spicy" and we also warn that Doritos Roulette are not recommended for young children'."