08/10/2015 07:43 BST | Updated 08/10/2015 11:59 BST

Suffragette Red Carpet Protest Sees Feminists Jump Barricades And Chant 'Domestic Violence Cuts Kill'

Feminist protesters hit the red carpet Wednesday alongside stars of the film Suffragette at the opening night of the BFI London Film Festival.

Scenes from real life mirrored those in the drama, which stars Carey Mulligan, Meryl Streep and Anne-Marie Duff.

Groups of women from Sisters Uncut, wearing tops with posters stuck on saying "Two women killed every week" and "Dead women can't vote", jumped the barriers and lay on the carpet while Duff and fellow actresses Helena Bonham Carter and Romola Garai gave interviews.


Protesters from anti-domestic violence group Sisters Uncut protest on the red carpet at the opening night of Suffragette in London

"We are suffragettes," they shouted, and "Domestic violence cuts kill," referring to cuts to domestic abuse services.

Other protesters held banners with the words "50/50 Parliament", calling for equality in the British Government, the Press Association reported.

Garai said: "I haven't spoken to them or seen their demands but I'm happy to see the suffrage movement is alive and happening."

Mulligan told Sky News she welcomed the protest - and that she believes the movie industry is "inherently sexist".

Speaking about the activists, she said: "It's so great, that's so exciting. People have asked us would you protest now, would you throw a rock?

"And I keep thinking I wish I could. I would like to be as brave as that. For these women to do that tonight, I think it's awesome."

The British star added: "I think our (film) industry is a microcosm of the world in general. So our society is inherently sexist and so our industry is but all major industry is."


The scenes in Leicester Square mirrored those in the period drama, which tells the story of the British women's equality movement of the late 19th and early 20th century.

Bonham Carter reportedly said of the activists: "I'm glad our film's done something, that's exactly what it's there for.

"If you feel strongly enough about something and there's an injustice there, then you can speak out and try and get something changed. It's the perfect response to our film."

Suffragette opened the London Film Festival which runs from 7 to 18 October.