booze

No more popping in to Wetherspoon for your favourite glass of Champers.
The term has a few origin stories.
My television has been permanently stuck on Channel 5 since I moved house and lost the remote control. I turn it on, get cosy, then remember I have no remote, so Channel 5 it is. Channel 5 has been an eye opener for me, and I've now become a reality TV addict.
We’ve all been there: you’ve drunk enough to sedate a horse and are now famished. You can’t go home yet - because hunger
Do you see how instantly, your predictable platitudes become a bit edgy? It is also an excellent idea to describe your blog as 'a bit sweary' or 'partial to profanity', or something equally contrived, somewhere on the homepage to draw in the cursey crowds.
The star of this grotesque circus is wealthy older man Donald Trump; who believes that being a famous, rich, white, racist, sexist qualifies him to be voted in as the 45th President of the United States during the election this November, while masterfully showcasing all that is wrong in the land of the free at the moment.
Like most everyone else in the British Isles, I was disappointed to discover last week that booze really is bad for us... at least, that's the latest line from the Government, as they promoted the updated guidelines on low-risk drinking for the UK.
The holiday season is here and with it comes an increased acceptance that getting wasted is the social norm. Which is fine for normal drinkers, but for alcoholics the Christmas season poses the risk of relapse and endangers themselves and everyone around them.
In 1950, Brits drank an average of 3.9 litres of pure alcohol per person. Then, in 1960, it begins to creep upward. The upward trajectory ends in 1980, but that turns out to be temporary. By the late 1990s consumption is rising rapidly again. Come Peak Booze, in 2004, we were drinking 9.5 litres of alcohol per person - the equivalent of more than 100 bottles of wine.