child sexual exploitation

Right now, an average of one child in every twenty has suffered sexual abuse. Every child is affected differently. But for
There is agreement from MPs of all parties, experts and organisations representing children - including Barnardo's - that change in this area is needed urgently but the government still needs a gentle push in the right direction. It's time to listen to what our children are telling us - they need the knowledge that will help keep them safe. They have spoken loud and clear and we cannot ignore them.
'It’s a scandal involving thousands and thousands of young girls.'
On beaches near Olympics venues in Rio, children’s bodies are being sold. Girls as young as eight are used as child prostitutes
Stamping out child abuse is the responsibility of everyone who works with children and NHS staff - from receptionists to nurses and doctors - are ideally placed to spot the signs of child sexual abuse and exploitation.
There are over three billion people around the world with internet access and there are enormous benefits to an ever more connected society. But we must do more to ensure that the internet remains safe for young people to explore, create, dream and achieve their true potential.
It's a statistic that never fails to shock: the vast majority of all child sexual abuse is concealed and never reported to the authorities. Only one in eight victims ever come to their attention.
High profile child sexual exploitation cases (CSE) like those in Rotherham and Rochdale have led many people to assume that all CSE victims are white British girls. But it's not the case. Worryingly, this stereotype highlighted in our report 'It's not on the radar', means that some front-line workers may be missing children affected by CSE.
Since the watershed moment when we discovered the extent of the utterly repulsive crimes committed by Jimmy Savile the number of reported sex offences against children has almost doubled. Last year our ChildLine service provided 3,150 counselling sessions- up 10% on the previous twelve months - for children, as young as nine, who had been targets of or were worried about being groomed online.
The term "child prostitution" is being removed from official statistics over concerns it it encourages "victim-blaming" in