Citizen journalism

World Press Freedom Day is a time to both celebrate press freedom and defend the media from attacks - we are doing more of the latter than the former
The advent of smart phones has given power to the people. The presence, speed and accessibility allows the everyday citizen to report and break news to a global audience faster than traditional journalists, and much faster than news reporters. This has resulted in a society that's more politically active than ever before (and that's a good thing.)
Increasingly, I link from Twitter and now Facebook as much as I go to news brands' own sites. The enmeshing of 'Old' and 'New' moves the speed versus veracity debate on to a more realistic debate of authenticity and engagement on consumers' terms.
Twitter has finally given its iPhone and Android app a major update bringing Vine-like video and the ability to send group
Stinson Hunter, subject of the controversial Channel 4 documentary 'The Paedophile Hunter' has turned to Kickstarter in order
MUMBAI -- Popular narratives about India typically divide the country into two neat halves. An aspirational urban middle class, whose command of English has seen the country surge as an IT superpower, and a wretched underclass, living in poverty, in remote rural expanses, cut-off from the very technologies that has India making the headlines from Bangalore to the Bay Area.
For Shu Choudary, journalism should be like oxygen: vital, always available and owned by no one. "No one owns the air, not
You might have already heard of Crowdfunding - the phenomenon by which an idea for a project or invention is relayed to the public, usually via the internet, in order to attract funds and become a reality. This year it has hit the mainstream with a bang - with celebrities such as Zach Braff and James Franco using it as a way to attain revenue for their own movie projects.
The revolutionary impact of fast spreading digital and mobile phone technologies underpin an on-going conversation, yet to reach its conclusion. From the perspectives of non-violence and social development, optimists argue that a mass communication infrastructure enables campaigners to challenge the conditions of injustice and oppression.
The anti-government protests in Turkey have made one thing clear: Erdogan, the Prime Minister, is not listening to his focus group. As any business owner knows, the thing about focus groups is that you don't always get to choose them. And with new media, you certainly don't get to choose who rates and criticises you in the public sphere.