Coast

You should stare down seagulls to save your chips, research has found. A new study by the University of Exeter discovered that seagulls are less likely to steal food when they’re being stared at. Researchers found that the birds took 21 seconds longer on average to steal chips while they were being watched.
We want an experienced shepherd, able to move their flock of sheep to ensure that sensitive habitats get the grazing they need. Plantlife Cymru have kindly offered to purchase the farmer's new flock. The National Trust will offer the successful applicant expert conservation and farming support, as well as providing a farmhouse with picture-perfect views over the North Wales coast.
The 'power' of nature is everywhere - volcanoes bursting from beneath the earth's crust, lightning turning the world white
Hull has been an unsung lynchpin in the historical makeup of our nation, a role it continued to fill effortlessly, even during Britain's darkest days during World War Two. Just as we have done throughout recorded history, Hull played an indispensible role in the allied defence of home soil, and indeed in the eventual allied victory, with the inhabitants of the city paying a massive price.
Close your eyes for a minute. Think of a favourite place on the coast. Tune into your memory sound bank and start to imagine the sounds that fill the airwaves. It could be the sounds from the days spent at the coast as a kid when the day felt like it would never end. Or it might be a trip to a seabird colony clinging to the cliffs and creating an intense wall of sound.
For many of us, the hooting, hollering and howling we hear on Britain's coast are a key part our childhood experiences. The British Library, National Trust for Scotland and National Trust's Sounds of our Shores project brings us closer to our coast, and the wildlife and people that help to shape it.
What am I waiting for next? Male silver washed fritillary spinning and dancing in flight, skydancing red kites, powdery pink pillows of thrift and purple spikes of spring squill on the coast, meadows filling with colour, the coconut gorse and a turquoise sea - and that's just on the coast. Lots to come!
These memories of days at the seaside as children are part of our national DNA. Millions of Brits head to the coast every year. And there is a rich social history of the connections between the big cities and the nearest stretch of coastline.
As a nation shaped by the coast and drawn to the sea the news, announced by the deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, that a coastal footpath around the shores of England will be completed ten years early by 2020 represents one great big stride to opening up access to a remarkable coastline.
Millions of us spend a fair amount of time daydreaming about being at the coast. Living by the sea with those views into what appears to be infinity and the dreamy sunrises and sunsets has enchanted generations. And yet that sense of things always being the same at the seaside, a constant in a turning world, seems to be changing.