consumer spending

Companies design for planned obsolescence - so that products breakdown forcing us to buy more and more often. But it was us that created psychological obsolescence. We want the newest, shiniest whatever the second it is available regardless of whether the slightly older, slightly less shiny thing is still working perfectly or is in no way demonstrably inferior.
Only about 25 per cent of online consumers impulse buy - a lot less than when they are in store. It's clear that online stores are currently missing a significant revenue opportunity. Rather than trying to define future purchases based on previous consumer behaviour, ambient ecommerce focuses on the 'here and now'.
GDP growth has outperformed consensus expectations since last summer and forecasts have been revised up significantly for the year ahead. But it is also clear that we still have some way to go to ensure that all consumers can look forward to sustained increases in their living standards.
Will the UK even get it? In a sense, all of this is hypothetical at this stage, since Amazon didn't even announce a UK release
These observations of UK e-commerce are in fact all the more interesting given that one of the hot topics going into 2014 was the news that more than one third of online sales are now reported to be made via mobile device.
Previously, economists have coined the term the 'lipstick effect' to describe consumers' desire to increase their purchase of goods, like lipstick and chocolate, when faced with an economic or social crisis.
The recovery seems to have well and truly set in. Today's ONS release of UK growth data suggests that the UK economy grew by 0.7% in the fourth quarter of 2013. With brighter prospects for the economy and wages, many commentators are hailing the end of the "cost of living crisis"...
The first few weeks of 2014 have shown that, while commentators and economists seem convinced that the recovery has set in, the economic and political battle over living standards and the cost of living remains as strong as it was in 2013.
All the talk over the last few years around the death of the High Street continues to bother me. It assumes one thing: that online is killing traditional retail and will be the final nail in the coffin. But as I have continued to ask, is that really the case?
When the Chancellor stands up to give his Autumn Statement on Thursday, he will be reassured that the economy and consumer views are more positive than this time last year. But Which? consumer insight shows that the battle isn't yet won.