Crime prevention

When I joined the Metropolitan Police in 1983 we were taught the principles of policing written by Sir Robert Peel in 1829
There is a paradox in the way that we currently deal with sex offenders; a contradiction that is putting innocent people in harm's way, and stopping us from preventing these horrible crimes from happening.
Like many organisations across the public sector, law enforcement agencies are expected to continuously improve their performance. Even when crime levels are low or falling, isolated failures are often put in the spotlight. This can in turn adversely impact public perceptions and decision-makers' reactions.
If properly exploited, this 'big data' goldmine could provide valuable insight for the Police, allowing them to do more with less and helping drive efficiencies. Unfortunately, agencies are not exploiting the full value of the data they have.
Social media and smartphone technology has improved to the point that you can pinpoint your exact location to a Facebook status or photo, or add a location to a Tweet, just as easily as you can send the message itself. This is all very well in the world of technology and social media, but not the smartest move if you're on the other side of the world and your house currently lies empty.