gas

While the news is dominated by conflict in Israel-Palestine and Iraq, tragedies elsewhere in the region are being overlooked. One tragedy is Iran's massacre of natives of the Arab-populated island of Qeshm.
The Kurds of Iraq cannot be accused of impatience over exploiting their energy riches. Oil has been underground for millennia and as it bubbled to the surface was used in traditional medical treatments. But those who ruled Iraq neglected it, apart from the Kirkuk region which was forcibly taken from the Kurds...
David Cameron is set to boost extra compensation offered to communities affected by controversial "fracking" to an average
European leaders have voiced their fury at Russian president Vladimir Putin, after he threatened "extreme measures" against
When countries set out their cases for energy independence, the main reason is generally cited as the need to ease reliance on oil and gas from unfriendly places. President Barack Obama's 'All of the Above' energy strategy for example, a plan that has seen this US administration extract more fossil fuels than any other, is very much predicated on the need to lessen oil imports from Iran and Saudi Arabia.
Abras Turco is reported as claiming to speak for 22 heads of indigenous communities in the region, and criticizing national, regional and local government 'for their incapacity to set in motion development projects.'
Why are these critical infrastructure companies failing these tests? After all most of these large organizations are serious about cybersecurity. They run specialized departments tasked with protecting two key networks: data center (servers) and office automation (workstations).
Language is very important and as we can see, getting it right can in some cases be a matter of life or death. And while I understand big companies need to chase people who do not pay their bills, they need to be accurate in the way they communicate with customers.
The lesson of this revolution is one that we have seen repeated time and again: market economies need good regulation and, with this in place, they generate benefits, efficiencies and opportunities, many of which are often unforeseen.
The announcement this week by the gas company Cuadrilla that it wants to drill and frack up to eight new wells in Lancashire has alarmed local people and green campaigners alike; they are worried about the impact of hydraulic fracturing - the controversial technique which involves injecting, at high pressure, a mixture of water, sand and chemicals into the earth to release shale gas - on the area's countryside and wider environment.