health tech

It's time we took the paralysing and dangerous fear people feel around sexual health really seriously
The recent news that the NHS’s so-called winter crisis is set to last until August will have been a major cause for concern
  Technology and innovation are being invoked as saviours of an over-stretched NHS whose seventieth birthday is looming. Whether
This points to a clear role for AI technology within healthcare: AI should be used to help both patients and doctors by facilitating more comprehensive health assessments, earlier diagnosis and better, more informed decision making.
No matter where you live, they could not be missed last summer: Pokémon seekers. Bent over their phones while walking for miles to catch the little creatures. Using augmented reality, Pokémon Go took the world by storm and became an overnight sensation, appealing to millions of younger people and the young at heart
With mounting pressure on the NHS from chronic cuts to funding and ever increasing demand on all sides, our safety net is starting to come apart at the seams. There has been much debate around both the implications of this and measures to be put in place to ease the pressure. One such measure is to modify the way we use other resources like pharmacies to redirect some of the flow.
What all of these efforts demonstrate - those by Touch Surgery, and doctors the world over - is the power of technology to help us break down the geographical barriers to raising the standard of surgery everywhere. Surgery at its core is about people and the unique encounter between a patient who needs help and a surgical team entrusted to deliver care.
Health Technology is a perfect litmus test for every other sector. Healthcare cannot do without technology and cannot deliver better results without advancing technology. The twist however, is that much of what goes on is life-critical, so tech used must work nigh perfectly pre-implementation.
These wearables will also help us determine what is "normal" for an individual. In the case of elderly at-risk people at home, this might be spotting when they haven't got up in the morning, or are getting up too frequently at night, and flagging the discrepancy to a care-giver.
Mobile devices and gadgets are now ubiquitous. According to Ofcom, at the beginning of 2015 in the UK, 93% of adults personally owned/used a mobile phone ‒ 66% of adults had a smartphone and 61% used their handset to access the Internet.