memories

Having Wikipedia on hand to resolve that argument in the pub might be useful, but it’s actually changing the way our memory
The new academic year will soon be upon us. Some parents will see their child head off for university. You may look at this as freedom-at-last: your child will be leaving home, allowing you to do what you have longed to do all these years. Some of you will fear the empty nest syndrome. And for others, possibly most, a mixture of both.
If you grew up in the 1970s and 1980s like I did, that first school trip may have been a day out at the zoo. Close your eyes and remember just how exhilarating it was to see wild animals in the flesh - to watch them, hear them and even to smell them.
The school where I work is saying goodbye, this week, to another sixth form year group, as the class of 2016 head off into
The findings could help provide treatments for people with PTSD.
Context plays a big role in our memories, both good and bad. For example, there's probably a song that reminds you of your
I've been in this bedroom since I was five. It's gone through multiple makeovers. From white walls with fairy images and glow in the dark stars; to an ocean blue with seahorse wall-paper and tween posters of tween crushes; to a very sophisticated beige and brown for the latter years.
We just mucked about all day with no rules to rein us in. We had no clock to worry about, or no structure to adhere to. We just simply went with the flow. An easy-going day full of fun, bonding and an astronomical amount of laughter.
It is really weird knowing that if I lose a memory, and only Mum would have remembered it, it is now a nothing. It's a gap. I don't know where it went or what it turned into but it's not there anymore. It's been replaced by space and silence. For the rest of my life, that gap will always be a gap; there will never again be a piece of memory that perfectly fits.
I didn't have a happy time at school. I was clever, and bored most of the time so I became rebellious. Smoking became interesting, as did drinking. After my GCSE's I changed schools, being awarded a music scholarship to a well-known boarding school.