Nationalism

As seamlessly as Beijing's recent parade that commemorated China's World War II victory over Japan went, how victorious was the victory parade, really? Are there negative ramifications?
And what's missing in this moment: the meaningful and moral response of European leaders ready to acknowledge that the influx of refugees is, in large measure, the consequence of Europe's own policy and foreign intervention failures.
On Sunday, the UK's foreign secretary Philip Hammond spoke candidly on the Calais situation, and more generally Europe's 'migrant crisis'. In a series of comments made in Singapore, he decried a situation where "Europe can't protect itself, preserve its standard of living and social infrastructure if it has to absorb millions of migrants from Africa."
I met Charles Kennedy once. I also met Benito Mussolini. One of these statements is true. The other one is a bit of an exaggeration
This is an enormous debate and affects countries far beyond the UK, but the recent UK election demonstrates clearly how the public are losing faith in a traditional approach to politics. Democracy can be difficult for most politicians to swallow, but if they don't listen to the people it's going to choke them all.
I'm not knocking the SNPs policies, its representatives, its priorities or it's values. I'm just a bit narked off that I'm putting all my energies into a stag hunt over here, and they've beggared off after a hare.
There is only one race and that is the human race, and the evidence is clear that humanity as a race is ecologically ignorant. Overall we are extremely arrogant in our general collective view of other species - so much so that practically every anthropocentric religion places humans in the center of creation as all important.
I've always thought that a nationalist in politics is about as much use as a religionist in a science debate, their judgement
The Cruiser had some of those tasteful elements admired by many writers, myself included. The consummate internationalist, he believed that people understand one another if they want to, no matter how great the language barrier.
Whatever the result of the referendum, it is likely to lead to a country that is deeply fractured, perhaps indefinitely. By and large this is a direct result of the campaigning tactics that Salmond has fostered, if not encouraged. He and the rest of the Yes campaign might not have destroyed Scotland in order to save it, but they might very well have irreversibly divided it.