trade unions

Economic growth is boosting company profits not worker’s wages, a dramatic report finds today as the Archbishop of Canterbury
Workers in two McDonald's restaurants in Crayford, south east London, and Cambridge made history on Monday 4 September when they became the first ever McDonald's workers in Britain to go on strike.
When Becky's daughter became very ill on a Saturday evening, she brought her to A&E. The nine-month-old was diagnosed with tonsillitis and an infection in both ears. The next day, which happened to be Father's Day, Becky had to miss work to look after her little girl. But when she went back on Monday her manager accused her of lying so that she could take Father's Day off. Becky is one of thousands of young parents who simply aren't getting the support they deserve at work.
This strike is a call for change. Our members demand to be listened too - they have a right to get their voice heard. Hopefully, senior figures at McDonald's will be listening, because this voice is not going to go away, and this behaviour can go on no longer.
If the decline in union membership and collective bargaining has been in part due to government action, then the solution to addressing and reversing the decline must also - in part - lie in government action.
There could be strength in and to be gained exploring how to develop a shared and joint approach to shared challenges and issues including social injustice. Has the time come to explore? I think that it has.
We'd have more confidence in Mr Fox's trade strategy if he was more open to trade union concerns and voices. But the fact that neither of our trade union movements have been consulted about this trip suggests it's not a real trade mission at all. Business organisations that we regularly engage with know nothing more than we do. And that really does imply that this visit is more of a public relations stunt than serious trade talks.
Only full and proper state regulation of our financial and economic systems can prevent such a calamity from happening again. But it will also need state intervention in employment matters to protect workers' interests and to support the creation of stronger unions to help in doing so. For a book that unfortunately will be beyond the financial reach of many, consider getting your union branch or public library to order a copy.
As general secretary of the CWU, I fully accept our own union must do more in the industries and sectors where we organise. But I also know no union can win by acting alone. This is why the CWU has consistently called for a concerted campaign to shift the balance of forces in the world of work and bring an end to insecure employment models and in-work poverty. Specifically, we say this means unions must come together like never before to deliver a new model of trade unionism.